Diane's Genealogy Blog 2012
Diane's Genealogy Blog 2013
Diane's Genealogy Blog 2014
Diane's Genealogy Blog 2015
Diane's Genealogy Blog 2016
Diane's Genealogy Blog 2017
Diane's Genealogy Blog 2018
Diane's Canal Blog
Feedback
Diane's Genealogy Blog
2017
Diane's Genealogy Blog 2018
[if you wish to contact me, my email address is: diane27@gmail.com or use the Feedback button above]

Currently working on a part of my father-in-law's tree, mostly centred in Woolwich, Kent, Essex and London.

Friday 20th July 2018

I have filled in gaps with electoral roll records and 1939 Register entries for both Victor Coxes, but nothing worth reporting here, except maybe the intriguing report on why Victor Frank Cox did not receive a pension after discharge from the Army in 1919. His gunshot wounds to the back were sufficient for discharge, but there is a report on the fact that he was punished for "improper conduct whilst on Hospital Guard in breaking into a hospital ward". He had been admitted to Colliton House Hospital Dorchester on 28th Oct 1918 with a shell-wound received on 22 Oct in France and kept in for 61 days, released on 27 Dec 1918 and this offence took place on 24 Jan. It's only guesswork but I wonder if he had become addicted to painkillers... He was sent home and was able to get a job, possibly with the gas company his father worked for, as in 1939 Register he can be seen living at 95 Bolina Road, Deptford, near his brother Charles - see 10th July below. Son Derek moved to Sutton after marriage. Victor was listed in 1939 as a Retort Stoker at S M Gas Co., so evidently recovered well from his injuries. He was also a Fire Watcher at the company, a very valuable occupation in wartime. Following his electoral roll addresses, he can be seen in 1945 at 53 Bolina Road, so didn't move away immediately after the bomb fell. I can see from a book of bomb damage in London, that a high-intensity bomb fell right on the railway arches and all the property at the north end of the road was destroyed, then some badly damaged. In the listing of 1945 the numbers on the odd side start at 45 and only go up to 79, so were obviously renumbered (so 53 may be the same as 95 in 1939). 1955 electoral roll records show that by then they had moved out as far as Crayford,

I don't know more about their move into Kent, just that Victor died in Thanet in 1962 and Parthenia in 1973. She died at Hill House Hospital, Thanet, which had previously been the workhouse but became a hospital in 1948, at creation of the NHS,
1930s
on 6 Jan 1973, it closed in 1986, was demolished in 1989 and a housing estate built there in 1993.



Tuesday 17th July 2018

Louisa Elizabeth Cox
- see 11th Mar 2013 - was covered in detail before, so now all I can add is the 1939 Register - oh, and a photo!

She is shown here with all six children, probably taken in about 1910. The Register shows just Louisa and George, at 19 Sheldon Street, Croydon, George listed as "flour warehouseman retired". He was 67 and died the following year. The house is still there, a nice enough end-terrace "cottage", although the view from it has not been improved!


[the Croydon flyover A232, constructed in 1969, and car-park below]

As Maria Mary (Minnie) Cox, her sister, also see 11th Mar 2013, lived her entire adult life at 2 Aberdeen Road, Croydon, it wasn't a surprise to find her there in 1939 Register. I actually did mention her last Friday - see 13th July below - when I found Edith there with her (previously having married her off). She was listed as "dressmaker & domestic", like Edith, but it seemed she also worked for the Blood Transfusion Service - obviously a very worthwhile cause, especially in wartime.

I spent a lot of time on fruitless searches for 18th century records involving Martha, Mary and Rebecca and confirming what I knew of Richard Cox. Various records of several Sarahs were also elusive.

Monday 16th July 2018

My 5xgreat uncle James Cox was frustrating. All I knew was his baptism 10 Aug 1754 at West Hanney. I was half asleep when recording details of a marriage to an Ann Major in the same village, with banns also read in Hampshire, so evidently her home town was there. It was only some time later - when the coffee kicked in - that I realised he was only 13! Back to the drawing board...the next alternative was the opposite, aged 59, marriage to Elizabeth Butler. So I was not confident this is correct either, there being no father's name to check against, so I wasn't surprised to find it was another James Cox, of the same age i.e. born 1794 not 1754. Unfortunately there are 6 James Cox deaths in Berkshire in the decades of his childhood and young adult years, and after that he could have gone anywhere. This is the difficulty with the 18th century.

James Henry Cox (another 5xgreat uncle) wasn't baptised, as I stated in 2013, at the age of nine. This was a mis-transcription and it was really a matter of weeks or days, as usual, on 14th Feb 1830. Leaving this late was very risky in those days with so much infant mortality, but some families did, I know. Everything else checked out.

The other James Henry Cox, his grandson, was of course around in 1939, The address was "The Hood", Cuckfield, but as the village was all house names, not road names, I cannot locate it. Findmypast have tagged it as half way up Vicarage Road, Crawley Down nowadays. The village faded when the railway bypassed it in favour of Haywards Heath, but the railway line ran quite close by. Not that this affected James, unless he commuted to London, which I doubt. He was a Chartered Accountant, but most people lived where they worked back then. I have searched Google Streetview but it seems when they rebuilt the properties they renamed them too, and it seems a shame that the only mention of the Police Station next door is in a document only available at Sussex archive. Anyway, the Register confirmed they didn't have children and they lived in Cuckfield, possibly from their marriage. Both James' parents & his wife died there, or rather Uckfield Hospital 14 miles away, then James went into a nursing home in Lewes when he became infirm and died there in 1975 aged 79. It is still there, a specialist dementia care centre.


Sunday 15th July 2018

George Henry Cox
- see 30th Mar 2015 - just needs 1939 filling in. It was right at the end of his life as he died 2 years later, and he can be seen still at 141 Sheen Road, Richmond, listed as "farrier retired" aged 73, with Julia, dressmaker. In seeing the register here, what I found fascinating was that the Skinner family next door ran a newsagent's and when I looked at Google Streetview again I found this is what it looks like today:

Investigating why his death was registered in Uckfield, which is 65 miles away, I looked at the children and discovered both daughters had died but son James lived in the right area, so both George and Julia probably moved in with him and he registered their deaths when they died in 1941 and 1950 respectively (and James' wife Gladys in 1962).

My great great grandfather, George William Cox 1, was covered on 22nd Feb 2013, as was George William Cox 2, his son and George William Cox 3, grandson. Unfortunately they all died before the 1939 Register (although for GWC2 it was only a matter of days). 1 died aged 78 in 1902 in the Lambeth Workhouse, 3 died aged 33 in WW1 in France and 2 died aged 85 on 3rd Sep 1939, 3 weeks before the Register was taken. I did, in my previous entry in 2013, mention the first attempt at a marriage with Eleanor in 1904, now I can show you the record:

This is unusual. The marriage did take place 3 months later


Gertrude Cox was with her mother in 1939 in Hungerford - see below - the only other new item is the scan of her baptism in Lambeth


Henry Thomas "Lal" Cox - see 24th Feb 2013 - I can now add his baptism at St Philip's, Lambeth - where my parents got married 53 years later


The 1939 Register was interesting here, as he had just been relocated by the merger of the company he worked for with another and he had to move from London to Liverpool. He can be seen lodging in Thornes Road, Liverpool, one of four tobacco dryers and 2 telephonists lodging with a widowed housekeeper (who was an ARP warden). Dolly can be seen with his uncle & aunt at Millbrook, Hungerford, John & Emily Taylor with cousin Doris and a closed file, presumably Peter. They evidently went on to join Henry in Liverpool as that was where Peter was married and his parents died.

Saturday 14th July 2018

Edward John Cox
was shown on the 1939 Register to be living at 7 Lower Road, Sutton, running a Draper's shop with his wife Gertrude (now confirmed to be Ellen Gertrude). Daughters Helen, Milinery Assistant, and Stella, shorthand typist, were also at home, aged 21 and 17 respectively. Looking up this address on Google Streetview, I can see that up until 2015 this was still a shop
2008
and has only recently been sold and renovated into what is now a home
2017

The Elizas, Elizabeth, Emily and Esther were all fully covered before.


Friday 13th July 2018

His father Charles John Cox was not helped by the 1939 Register, unfortunately, having died in 1935. No new records have emerged except a couple of electoral rolls, confirming the address I already knew, in 1905-7.

The account of Edith Fanny Cox - see 27th Mar 2015 - was left incomplete due to lack of later records.

But for once the 1939, in coming to the rescue, put the cat among the pigeons and caused me to throw out my previous research! In 1939 she was still living with her sister Maria at the parental home, 2 Aberdeen Road, and never married, both working as dressmakers & domestics I have now been able easily to find her death record in 1964 under her maiden name. (I did have my doubts about a husband 22 years younger, but know it does happen). By the way, Harry Fullick can be seen in 1939 with another Edith F, but she was much more his age, having date of birth in 1900, i.e. born 2 years after him.

The Edward Coxes needed following up in 1939 too - it has shown it's value in two ways recently - except Edward Albert, who died in WW1. We do know what Edward Dance Cox (Ted) was doing - see 11th Feb 2013.

That was when the brewery where he worked closed down and they moved to Lambourn, where he pined and died. As the 1939 Register was taken in September, it shows that they had already moved to Berkshire and Ted can be seen living with widowed daughter Winifred and what looks like her brother-in-law and family at Beales Farm, listed as Off-Licence Manager Retired. Harriet can be seen at Newbury Street, Hungerford, with her brother Tom & his family, also her daughter Gertrude & baby daughter Jill - see 4th March below.

Tuesday 10th July 2018

In 2015 I left Charles Albert Cox

when they married in 1911 & had a son Albert in 1913. In filling the gap the 1939 Register has again come to the rescue, as they can be seen at 60 Bolina Road, Deptford (*) with Albert. The Register gives me their exact dates of birth and states Charles worked in engineering for a leather belt manufacturer, a heavy worker (and thus was given more rations) and Albert Edward Frederick - to give him his full title - aged 26 was working as a journalist/typist. He was very keen on his full name, but there was another with the same combination in Fulham, who confused me with a marriage before the 1939 census... And there was another Charles Albert Cox, much in evidence in the City of London. Likewise, although I believe the death record in 1947 I postulated in 2013 in Surrey for Helene, I see the one for Charles had the wrong middle initial. As son Albert lived in Greenwich I believe Charles died there in Dec 1967.
* looking into Bolina Road, I can see that it is now "light industrial units", after a high-explosive bomb landed here in 1940. This would be worrying if I didn't know they survived. But they must have moved away to Surrey not long after this, and that is why Helene's death-place was some miles from home, 8 years later.

Monday 9th July 2018

As it has been more than three years since I studied my maternal grandfather's family, I thought I'd have a look and straight away uncovered a very interesting story regarding Albert Cox! So I shall, as usual, go through the Cox family in alphabetical order, starting with him.

Albert Charles Cox was dealt with on 1st Feb 2013 and 23rd Mar 2015, when I left him unfinished because I couldn't find deaths for his wife Elizabeth and himself. The 1939 Register has helped here, as I located Elizabeth, living alone as a widow on "private means" at 45 Fairholme Road, Croydon

Wondering where Albert had got to, tracing backwards, I got a shock when I found his death. Apparently, just after I left them in South Croydon in 1911, he had enlisted in the army. He was assigned to the Royal Irish Rifles, 14th battalion and sent to the "Western European Theatre", where on 21 Apr 1917 in France he died of wounds. Elizabeth remained in Croydon and died in Dec 1957 aged 86.

There appeared to be similarities here with the story of Archibald Charles Cox, who also joined up and was killed - see 26th Mar 2015 and 2013 - in WW1 and he too married a girl called Colwell. However, they existed in entirely different counties and were only related in that Archibald's grandfather and Albert's father were brothers, making them first cousins once removed. Picking up Archibald's widow after his death, I can see that Winifred remarried in the same church she had used to marry Archibald, Holy Trinity, Drybrook, Gloucestershire

to marry Herbert Fidler. They can  be seen in 1939 Register in Swansea, Wales, much to my surprise. They lived at 149 Manor Road, Herbert working on the railways - as GWR (Great Western Railways) engineman.

[the house next door did not exist in 1939, 149 was the last before the woodland at the top]
Prior to the war (1935 electoral roll) they had been living in Newbury, Berkshire, where Herbert came from, and they must have returned there after the war, as he died there in 1973 and Winifred returned to her birthplace, the Forest of Dean, when she died in 1978.

Sunday 8th July 2018

William Brewster2
was his father, born in May 1767 in Roxwell to William3 & Mary née Marriage and christened there on 7 June. On 6 Feb 1797 at the same church he married Elizabeth Clark and they had 6 children.

In 1841 census they can be seen at Boyton Cross, a hamlet to the north of Roxwell, with 3 others, an 80-year-old called Sarah Palmer and 2 young Ag Labs.
1895
Elizabeth died the following year, so in 1851 census William is a widower, living with daughter Elizabeth, a nurse, and her husband in Chignall St James, the next village to the north. He died there on 4 Jan 1854.

His father William Brewster3 (Cliff's 4xgreat grandfather) was born in Jan 1737 in Roxwell to Thomas & Elizabeth née Tilbury and christened there on 19 Feb. On 4 Nov 1764 at the same church he married Mary Marriage and they had 7 children. William died aged 85 and was buried 23 Jun 1822 in Good Easter. Mary lived until 98 but still died before the first census. She joined William in Jan 1841.

William Brewster4 was Cliff's 7xgreat uncle, born to Thomas7 & Ann née Turner - see 2nd July below - in May 1690, twin of John and christened with him on 25 Jun 1690 at Good Easter. On 3 Feb 1711 at the same church he married Margaret Asser and they had 3 children before both dying aged 30 and being buried together there on 17 Jan 1720, "In Woollen". This is an interesting concept and worth stopping to consider.
In the latter half of the 17th Century in England, many towns depended on the trade of wool and this went into a decline due to imports from other countries. So Acts of Parliament were imposed, the Burial In Woollen Acts 1666-80, requiring all but plague victims to be buried in pure English woollen shrouds. No foreign textiles were allowed, and a £5 fine imposed for non-compliance (about £3000 today). This rule was in force until 1814, but was generally ignored after 1770, when the wool trade improved.
Son Jonathan died at this time too (he was buried just befor Christmas), so Sarah and William were left orphaned aged 8 and 3 respectively.

His uncle William Brewster5 was born in Aug 1669 in Good Easter to Thomas & Ann née Gower and christened there on 6 Sep. I cannot track doen a marriage, but if he married an Elizabeth elsewhere (it was traditional for brides to be married in their home town) around 1697, then he was father of Elizabeth (1698), Anna (1700) and Mary (1703) and died and was buried 20 Aug 1740, all in Little Baddow.

Saturday 7th July 2018

William Brewster1
was born in Good Easter in Feb 1801 to William2 and Elizabeth née Clark and christened there on 15 Mar 1801. On 28 Jun 1823 in Writtle he married Sarah Green from Roxwell and they had 4 children. In 1841 census they can be seen in Bridge Street, Writtle with 4 children, in 1851 with 2 and in 1861 the same, with son William next door. He was a baker, William senior an Ag Lab. Sarah died in 1863 so in 1871 census William can be seen widowed, living with daughter Sarah and family. The address is next to the Chequers Inn, Sarah's husband James Rumsey running a grocer's shop


William died here aged 74 in Jan 1875

Tuesday 3rd July 2018

Thomas Brewster8
, Cliff's 8xgreat grandfather, was born in 1626 in Good Easter to John & Jane née Roberts. In 1651, I understand, he married Ann Gower at the same church. They had 4 children but Ann died aged 47 and Thomas aged 55 in 1681. They were both buried in Good Easter.

Thomas Henry Brewster
(Cliff's great great-uncle) has had his story told in previous entries of his father and children. He was born in Sep 1834 in Southwark to Thomas2 and Martha née Sellman and christened on 1 Oct 1834 at St John the Evangelist, twin to Joseph

He can be seen on censuses of 1841 aged 6 in Christchurch, Southwark, in 1851 at 5 Lower Swan Court as an Errand Boy and in 1861 the same as a Warehouseman, all with parents & siblings. On 7 Mar 1863 at St Olave's, Tooley Street, Southwark he married Emma Henrietta Reseigh

In 1871 they can be seen to have settled a few houses away from his parents, at 61 Webber Street with 3 children and he was working at the hat factory. In 1881 they had moved to 15 Angel Place with 4 children, Thomas at that point was Out Of Employment, but by 1891 they had moved to 135 Scovell Road, then 1901 34 Union Road, and he continued to work as a hatter. From previous cases, I am surprised he was 69 when he died, a good age for the time, despite his occupation, in Jul 1903. Emma had died the previous year.
Her father had been a hatter too, and she was christened at the same church as Thomas, 6 years after him. The surname is odd, but her father appears to be from Cornwall, her mother from Kent, married in Kennington in 1833.

As Walter died in infancy the only remaining Brewsters are the five Williams, and I'll come back to you on them. (There are 3 others but they are all several times removed)

Monday 2nd July 2018

Thomas Brewster5
was Cliff's 5xgreat grandfather, born in Jan 1707 in Roxwell to Thomas 6 and Sarah née Harvey

[modern map - Chelmsford is off to the right]
and christened there on 9 Feb 1707 at St Andrew's church
St Andrew's

On 25 Jan 1732 at St Edmund's, Abbess Roding he married Elizabeth Tilbury. You can see the village in the map above, as well as Beauchamp Roding, where Elizabeth lived.
St Edmund's
They had 7 children, all christened in Roxwell, but Thomas died when he was only 47 and was buried 17 Jan 1754 in Roxwell. Elizabeth followed in 1785.

His father, Thomas Brewster6, was born Oct 1681 in Good Easter to Thomas7 and Ann née Turner and christened there at St Andrew's on 30 Nov. On 30 Sep 1705 he married Sarah Harvey from Pleshey at the same church - you can see Pleshey on the map above, top right. They had 7 children but one died in infancy and one in her teens (both Sarahs). Thomas died aged 56 and was buried in Good Easter on 21 Mar 1738 and Sarah followed him 3 years later.

Thomas Brewster7 was Cliff's 7xgreat grandfather, born Sep 1655 in Good Easter to Thomas8 and Ann née Gower and christened there on 1 Oct. On 30 Aug 1680 he returned to the church to marry Ann Turner, also from Pleshey (as was Thomas' mother above), daughter of John & Joanne née Fanshawe - buried in Pleshey along with Ann's 3 brothers John, Ralfe and Nathaniell, who died in infancy. Thomas6 & Ann had 10 children, seemingly including 3 sets of twins, but records this far back depend upon baptisms, and as we know, some families did this in groups, so can get confusing. 1682 looks to have been a bad year for them, as Ann gave birth to twins Ann and Mary early in the year and buried them both in Sep/Oct. Then she had another daughter in November, who they called Mary Ann! A further set of twins in 1686 resulted in one death and another set in 1690 both survived. Final child Jonathan, born in 1692, died aged 3. Thomas died aged 74 and was buried 5 Dec 1729 in Roxwell.

Sunday 1st July 2018

Thomas Brewster2
was Cliff's great great grandfather and grandfather of Thomas1 discussed yesterday. He was born in 1803 (I can't find a baptism) at Doddinghurst, Essex to William & Elizabeth née Clark. On 20 Apr 1829 at Holy Trinity Newington he married Martha Sellman and they had 6 children.

In 1841 census they can be seen in Christchurch, Southwark with 5 children Martha's sister and nephew
- see Joseph Brewster 18th June below - Thomas working as a porter. By 1851 he had trained and was practicing as an optician, living at 5 Lower Swan court with five children, the same in 1861 with 3 children and a boarder. By 1871 he was 70 years old and was semi-retired, listed as "optician's labourer" - maybe, ironically, his own eyesight wasn't good enough to practice. They lived at 68 Webber Row, a few houses down from his grandson Thomas1, and Thomas died there in Jul 1879 aged 76

Thomas Brewster3 was Cliff's 4xgreat uncle, born Mar 1775 in Roxwell to William & Mary née Marriage, and christened there on 23 Apr.

In 1797 he married Mary Murdoch at Writtle church and in 1841 & 1851 censuses can be seen living the village there, Thomas working as an Ag Lab.

He died there in Oct 1857 and Mary followed in 1866. I cannot see that they ever had any children.

Thomas Brewster4 was Cliff's 5xgreat uncle, born in Mar 1735 in Roxwell to Thomas5 and Elizabeth née Tilbury and christened there on 20 Apr. On Christmas Eve 1760 he married Sarah Vice at her local church in the village of Shellow Bowells, St Peter & Paul

1798
It seems they only had one child, Thomas born 1771, but as I know nothing else about him he is not in my list. Both Thomas and Sarah died within a few days of each other in June 1789 and were buried in Shellow Bowells.

Saturday 30th June 2018

In tackling the Thomases, I think I shall deal with them in reverse chronological order. there is a trunk of Thomases on this tree and a few others. In fact there is a Thomas Brewster in every generation I have so far found, 9 of them! The last generation of these was born on 14 Aug 1864 in Southwark to Thomas Henry & Emma née Reseigh. He was the last because he had no Thomases himself, his siblings were mostly sisters, brother Henry may have had a Thomas I don't know about who died in infancy - of his 7, 4 died - and brother Walter died in infancy. His sister Helen had a Thomas but he was Haxton and died aged 4 anyway. Thomas1 can be seen in census of 1871 aged 6 with parents & sibs at 61 Webber Street, then in 1881 at 97 Shoe Lane, St Bride's, working as a general servant to a coffee house keeper. This was only temporary though, as when baptised a few weeks later at St Paul's, Westminster Bridge Road, he gave his home address as that of his parents, 15 Angel Place - or his father did, if  he arranged it, which is likely. On 26 Oct 1884 at St John the Evangelist, Lambeth he married Alice Rose Clifford, possibly a colleague's daughter, as he was by now a Cook.

In 1891 they can be seen at 55 Friar Street with 3 children and brother Henry (see 16th June below), Thomas now working as a Railway Porter, probably at nearby Borough station. The first electric underground line had opened the previous year, the City & South London Ralway, extending from the City to Stockwell

[Illustrated London News 1890]
He may have been a train enthusiast and couldn't resist changing career as it was so close by. I don't know what happened to the family in the next few years, as both he and Alice vanish from the records. There is an entry with their initials at the Lunatic Asylum at St George the Martyr but I cannot be sure it relates to them, obviously. There is a death record for a Thomas Brewster of the correct age in 1904 in Chelsea, just across the river, but again I cannot be sure. Again, in 1911 census I can't locate Alice, but she remarried on 2 Nov 1919 in Camberwell to Alfred Bennett, another porter. She died there in Sep 1936 aged 72. I think Alfred died in 1934, but it is a very common name...

Friday 29th June 2018

Now it's time for key ancestor Susan J Brewster, Cliff's great grandmother. She was born in Jan 1831 in Lambeth to Thomas & Martha née Sellman and christened at Holy Trinity, Newington on 27 Feb.




In 1841 census she can be seen in Christchurch, Southwark, the hat district, and her father was a porter (if you remember, I suggested he might be transporting hats).. On 2 Jul 1839 at St Mary's, Lambeth, she married Joseph Hodd (see 18th Jul 2014) and they had 9 children. The 1851 census shows them at 63 Tiverton Street, Joseph working as a Rule Maker and Susan Cap Maker (this may be why she was just 50 when she died - the unhealthy occupation). I still cannot find the 1861 record, but in 1871 the family are all there at Royal Terrace, Walworth. One puzzling thing is that when Susan died, of meningitis, the address was 8 Prince's Road, and a few weeks later for 1881 census the family were at 18 John Street, Lambeth. These addresses are very close, and I suspect she was using the medical facilities of the Workhouse, which was in Prince's Road. (I think she may have had Ellen there in 1855 - maybe this pregnancy was more troublesome than the others - as there is a record that fits)

I have changed my mind about Joseph's death since covering him in previous years (2014 & 2016). The chap of the same name who died in Croydon can be traced before and after and a now think was another man entirely. There is a death record in Lambeth in 1883, but it isn't on Ancestry for some reason

I wasn't helped here by the fact that none of his children have "deceased" on their marriages - although he didn't sign them!

There are (at least) 8 Thomases on this tree and I am trying to sort them out. I shall cover them tomorrow.

Thursday 28th June 2018


Another of Cliff's 3xgreat aunts was Sarah Brewster, born Dec 1799 in Roxwell to William & Elizabeth née Clark, and christened there on 19 Jan 1800. However, she died only a few weeks later on 14 Feb 1900.

The other Sarah Brewster was a 4xgreat aunt, born in Jan 1772 in Roxwell to William & Mary née Marriage and christened there on 9 Feb. On 6 Nov 1798 she returned to the same church to marry Thomas Dennis, brewer (maybe he should have taken her name!). They only had one child and Thomas died in 1824 aged 51. Apparently he owned the pub (or a share in it) the Prince of Saxe Coburg, 886 Old Kent Road, London. There are stories on Ancestry and UK Pub History regarding the problems with upkeep of the pub when it passed to daughter Mary and her husband. However, I am not 100% certain I have the right Sarah, because in these documents she married a second time and I have her death as Dennis. Having said this, I do see that in 1851 census she calls herself "brewer's widow". My other doubt is that she and Thomas always seem to be centred in Essex, when the pub is in South London and Thomas ostensibly died in Gravesend, Kent.

[it has had many names over the years but apparently still stands]
In 1841 census Sarah can be seen, a lady of independent means, living with a relative Samuel Dennis and his family (possibly a great-nephew of Thomas) in Rayleigh, Essex and then in 1851 she can be seen at North Street, Rochford with a servant, and that was where she died in Jul 1857 aged 85.

Saturday 23rd June 2018

OK, back to the Brewsters

Mary Brewster2 was born in Roxwell, Essex 1807 to William & Elizabeth née Clark and christened there on 4 Oct. On 29 Sep 1828 in Writtle nearby she married William Lincoln

and they settled in that village, raising 4 children. In 1841 census they can be seen there with 3 sons, William working as an Ag Lab, in 1851 the address is Oxney Green - as it may have been in the previous one, the 1841 is infamously short of detail - the settlement can be seen on the map below (Roxwell is to the north):
1805
They had 3 children at home as John was in service as a servant to a couple in the village. By 1861 the address was "Cottages, Writtle" and Mary had been widowed, son John was at home, working as a farm labourer, William as a shepherd, this time Sarah was a servant nearby. Mary died in Jul 1869 aged 62.

Mary Brewster3 was born Oct 1768 in Roxwell to William & Mary née Marriage and thus one of Cliff's 4xgreat aunts, christened in Roxwell on 20 Nov 1768. On 2 Nov 1783 she married Joseph Fell, but apart from his living in Boreham at the time I know nothing of him. They had 3 sons but both Mary and Joseph died before the first census, in 1840 and 1834 respectively.

Friday 22nd June 2018

If you have read this blog for any length of time you will know that my father's grandmother Catherine Noonan was Irish, but that I am very unsure about that branch, and was told when I visited Ireland that all Cork Catholic records were lost. Findmypast have contacted me to say they have acquired a vast amount of Irish Catholic records, so I am going to have another go at tracing them.

All I know for sure is that she was born around 1839 in Cork, and had 3 siblings, Margaret (b 1836), William James (born 1834) and John (born 1827) who all travelled with their mother also Catherine (b about 1802) to London. I did some study on St Patrick's Day - see 17th March below - and want to prove/disprove this now.
The baptism in St Finbarr's appears to be correct, as there were also equivalents for her siblings, so I am confident these are the ones. Now that I can see the records, I don't believe Catherine Hyde's father was Bernard, it looks more like "Con" to me (certainly not a B) or "Cor". Putting this information into a search box came up with a sister Ann/Nan baptised 9 Jan 1810 and Margaret in 1805, both at St Finbarr's. Going back and looking for their marriage was hard, as he appears with various spellings, and Nancy can be Ann(e), but I think I found a marriage on 20 Feb 1798 at St Mary's.

As far as death records are concerned, I understand these are few and far between, largely due to the informality of death in Ireland, wakes and burials being sometimes unmarked by documentation. The only one I can find for a James Noonan is in Jan 1851 in Carrick Edmond in Longford County, under the name Newman, so I am very unsure if this is relevant. I do know he didn't go with them to London and his wife was a widow in 1861 census in London. He was shown as an innkeeper (deceased) on his daughter's marriage in 1867.
Possible records for sisters Margaret and Ann Hyde marriages are to Edward Collins (1835) and Timothy Power (1828) respectively, but I cannot be sure.
Going back another generation doesn't seem possible as yet, records not extending back to the mid 18th century for baptisms of Con & Ann.
Returning to James Noonan, I found what could be 4 brothers for him, baptised at St Mary's, Cork by parents William & Honor née Connell, David 1787, William 1790, Edmund 1792 and William 1801. The re-use of the name William suggests the older one died, but I have explained thre are not many death records.

Well, that was an interesting exercise. I shall return to it anon, so watch this space.

Tuesday 19th June 2018

Martha Brewster
, one of Cliff's great great-aunts, was born in 1832 in Southwark to Thomas  and Martha née Sellman. She was one of the children baptised en masse on 1 October 1834 at St John the Evangelist, when she was 2 years old. Then the 1841 census shows her aged 9 at Bear Lane (see brother Joseph below) and 1851 Lower Swan Lane, a 19-year-old servant. On 11 Jul 1853 at Lambeth St Mary she married local boy George Robinson and they had 7 children. In 1861 census they can be seen at 9 Wellington Place, Newington with 3 children, George a "Packer at Druggist" and Martha a Capmaker. In 1871 they were at 3 Clarence Place, Newington with all 7 children, also 2 visitors were staying. Both of these addresses were in the many little courts and alleys off Newington Causeway, now gone. In 1881 George had changed jobs and now worked as a Commission Agent and they had relocated to 75 Inville Road, Walworth, a mile away (modern housing now), with 5 children, including son George, a waiter, and his wife & son. By 1891 George had died (I am unsure of which death record is his, as with such a common name there are 8 in London alone) and Martha can be seen with daughter Jane and family in 31 Tyers Street, Lambeth (Vauxhall). She called herself "lady's companion", but that may just mean she lived with her daughter to help look after the children. She put herself on the list for an almshouse and in 1901 census can be seen in one at 18 Draper's Alms Houses, Glasshouse Street (off Tyers Street), the road where incidentally my grandfather grew up - they are completely unrelated - around this time. She died there in Oct 1904 (the year Grandad was born)


Martha Brewster2
was her niece, born 29 Aug 1876 in Southwark to Thomas & Emma née Reseigh and christened aged 4 with a bunch of siblings on 5 May 1881 at St Paul's, Westminster Bridge Road.

A few weeks before this, the 1881 census showed them at 15 Angel Place, then in 1891 at 135 Scovell Road (see Emma and Helen below). On Christmas Day 1897 she returned to this church to marry cook James John Nuttall, witnessed by Henry Brewster and Emma Kibble (her siblings). They only had one son and can be seen in 1901 census with him and her parents, James listed as Hotel Cook, at 34 Union Road, Newington. By 1911 he parents had died and James & Martha can be seen at 29 Cavour Street, with their son and her nephew James Kibble (Union Street and Cavour Street became Edward Street, then Harper Street but it has all changed now). We know Martha was a cap maker, and so when she died aged 37 I wasn't surprised. Her son William was only 14, but his father soon remarried. He married a widow with 3 young children, Lilian Maud Tyson née Huggett and they can be seen in 1939 Register at 4 Orient Street, Southwark, James listed as "Cook & Carver", step-daughter Lily a waitress. This is what no. 4 looks like now, but it has obviously been rebuilt since then

James died in 1954 aged 79.

Mary Brewster1 was born in Apr 1839 in Southwark to Thomas & Martha née Sellman. I cannot find a baptism for her but she can be seen in 1841 census at Bear Lane with the family, aged 2. In 1851 and 1861 she was at Lower Swan Court, in the latter a cap-maker. On 21 May 1863 at St Mary's, Lambeth she married Thomas Pittman, a felt-hatter and they can be seen in census of 1871 at 68 Belber Row, London Road, Southwark with 3 daughters and a lodger. The youngest, Martha, was only 5 when he died aged 35 (those hats again!) in 1874. Mary remarried in Apr 1880, but almost immediately was widowed again. In 1881 census she can be seen at 20 Tower street, London Road with 3 daughters, Elizabeth and Martha hers, and Susan aged 9 James'. If she is the Mary Perry who died in Jul 1902 I cannot find the intervening 2 census records. But otherwise, she may have moved away. I did see that one of her daughters went to Wales...

Monday 18th June 2018

John Brewster2
was his uncle, born in 1782 in Roxwell to William & Mary née Marriage (seems an odd thing to say) and christened there on 5 Oct 1783. Unfortunately he was mixed up in the multiple records I mentioned yesterday, with the added difficulty of being mostly pre-census. On 23 Oct 1798 he married Mary Beadle, a lady 5 years old than he, when he was just 16. Daughter Mary was christened in Oct 1799, so she may have been born earlier that year... They followed up with 3 more children but I cannot track the family down in censuses, so they may both have died before 1841 (common names like John and Mary don't help at all!)

I seem to have missed out 3 of his siblings, so will cover them now out of sequence:

James Brewster had a short story. He was born in Apr 1765 in Roxwell, was christened there on 26 May and died aged 2 on 17 Jun 1767.

Elizabeth Brewster was born 6 Mar 1777 at Roxwell and christened there on 16 Nov. She must have gone to London, probably to work, as on 28 Mar 1796 at St Giles-Without-Cripplegate, then in Middlesex, she married Benjamin Flint. This church had been on the site since before 1090, when it was first recorded. Apparently Oliver Cromwell was married here in 1620, John Milton buried in 1674, John Bunyan & Daniel Defoe attended and (more interesting to me) Rick Wakeman recorded music here in the 1970s.

It still stands, but is now surrounded by the modern buildings of the Barbican. Benjamin was a "cock-founder", i.e. he made taps etc out of brass, and they had 6 children before he died in 1831 aged 56. He was buried in the churchyard at St Luke's, Old Street, which had been built in the 18th Century to take the overflow from St Giles. (In 1959 St Luke's closed and the altar etc returned to St Giles. According to Wikipedia,

A total of 1053 burials were recorded and removed during the restoration of the crypt. A documentary "Changing Tombs" covering the removal of the burials was produced at the time and can be found on YouTube.
St Luke's is now a concert hall, having been largely rebuilt in 1963). Their home address was Gee Street, just around the corner from St Luke's
early 1900s
Elizabeth was still at the same address when she died on 25 Jan 1841 and was buried with Benjamin at St Luke's. She didn't quite make the first census, which was taken on 6 June that year.

Abraham Brewster was the youngest child of William & Mary, born in Mar 1786 in Roxwell and christened there on 9 Mar. On 12 Oct 1808 in Roxwell he married Ann Innever and they had 4 children. In 1841 census they can be seen at Chalk End, Roxwell with 3 children (the two older ones had left home). He was one of the ubiquitous Ag Labs, as was his son.

In 1851 they were still there with just Maria, the youngest, Abraham died Apr 1853 and Ann 1857, aged 67 and 70 respectively.

Joseph Brewster is a return to the Southwark branch, born there in Sep 1834 to Thomas & Martha née Sellman and christened on 1 Oct 1834 at St John the Evangelist, Lambeth
  
In 1841 census he can be seen aged 6 at Bear Lane, Christchurch, Southwark, just around the corner from the hatters, so it's not surprising that he became one. At this early stage though, his father was a porter (possibly transporting hats) and with the family can be seen an Elizabeth Sellman, cap-maker - no doubt related to his mother. By 1851 his father had trained as an optician and Joseph & his twin Thomas were working as Errand Boys, the family living at 5 Lower Swan Court, Tanner Street (where his sister Elizabeth lived - see 15th June - after her husband's death). In 1861 census they were at the same address, father still an optician, twin Thomas now a warehouseman. But Joseph called himself a Hatter. On 30 Jul 1864 he married Mary Ann Elizabeth Harding from Holborn, whose father (with the lovely name of Luke Burgoyne Harding) owned a cab. Unfortunately we know the effects of working with hats, and they only managed one child, son Joseph Alfred in 1868, before Joseph died aged 36. Ann moved to Camberwell and kept herself by teaching piano, then to Poplar on her retirement and died there in 1914 aged 75. Son Joseph Alfred worked as a printer, but living in Stamford Street where the hatters were, surrounded by mercury vapours, he died aged only 43. However, in order to make up for being an only child, he fathered ten children before he went.

Sunday 17th June 2018

John Brewster
was born in 1804 to William & Elizabeth née Clark, and thus was Thomas' sister and Cliff's 3xgreat-uncle. He has caused me so much anguish, as there were two John Brewsters born in that year in the Chelmsford area, who both married Anns. I have had to unravel a family who originally seemed to consist of 17 children over a 28 year period! I have narrowed him down to the one baptised on 26 Aug 1804 at St Michael & All Angels church in Roxwell

On 12 Nov 1831 he married Ann Ellis at her local church at Willingale-Spain, a village nearby:

Willingale had two parisheses and the two churches share a churchyard. St Andrew's on the left covers Willingale-Spain, St Christopher's on the right Willingale-Doe. John and Ann married at the one on the left (although in 1861 Ann said she came from Willingale Doe). In 1841 census they can be seen at Ropers, Roxwell, which was a farm in those days and they inhabited one of the cottages for farm workers, which John was, along with his sons in later years.
Ropers
In 1841 they had with them 4 children, by 1851 seven then 1861 four again. In 1871 only three remained and one grandson. All were at Ropers and that was where Ann died in 1875 and John in 1877. they are no doubt buried at St Michael's, shown above. Although not quite having 17 children, it seems he was responsible for eleven of them!


Saturday 16th June 2018

Helen Brewster
continued
She can be seen in census records of 1881 & 1891 with parents & siblings at Angel Place and Scovell Road - see sister Emma below. On 24 May 1896 at St Crispin's, Bermondsey she married Francis George Haxton. I hadn't come across this church before, so I read around. Apparently it was built 1876, so was only 20 years old when Helen was married there, and the only picture of it is this one, unfortunately in bad condition:

The building was destroyed in WW2, demolished and rebuilt on the same site in modern style. They were lucky enough to get one of the new properties provided by the Guinness Trust, built to provide basic housing for the working class (no electricity or water supply to the 457 tenements, built in four 6-storey blocks, just to common areas, where residents had to go to cook, clean etc). The area was cleared in the 1970s for development, as so much of this area was. Francis was a General Labourer, and they can be seen in 1901 census at 444 Pages Walk, Guinness Trust Buildings with 3 children.

Unfortunately both Francis and his 4-year-old son Thomas died in the Oct quarter of 1901 in Dartford. As I can see no connection with that town I would guess that they died of one of the epidemics so rife at the time. There were epidemics of cholera and smallpox going around, the former blamed on troops returning from the crimea. I worked in a hospital in Dartford in the 1970s, which had formerly been used as an isolation unit for these cases, so it may well have been there they died. Helen moved back to the Webber Street area and can be seen in 1911 census at 139 Mitre Street (off the map below to the left) with two daughters and a boarder. She stated she was widowed and worked as a "helmit (sic) trimmer" for a hatter, working from home. (She appeared to have given birth to another daughter after the death of her husband, in 1905 but I cannot trace this Evelyn after this, so it may be an error. In 1911 her eldest daughter Eleanor Rose was in hospital in Gloucestershire, presumably convalescing in the country. This didn't ultimately work, however, as she died on 3 Jan 1914 aged 15. Her death was registered in Lambeth and she was buried in Southwark on 10 Jan). Mitre Street is now Mitre Road, and numbers only go up to 114, so I cannot show a picture of where the family lived. By 1939 Helen was 66 years old and can be seen in the Register living at 73 Cliffview Road, Lewisham with daughter Florence and family. Helen described herself as "office cleaner retired" so that's what she must have done in the previous decades to keep herself and her daughters. She died in Jan 1947 aged 73 in Surrey Mid-Eastern (Croydon) area.

Henrietta Brewster was born Oct 1865 to Thomas Henry & Emma in Southwark and appeared in the 1871 census with them at 61 Webber Row aged 5. However, there was a rushed christening on 2 Apr 1872 at St Paul's, Lorimer Square (no details completed on form) and she died very soon after. The "P" on left margin means Private; probably Mr Bicknell was called to the house as they knew she was about to expire, and it wasn't at the church at all.

The next baby followed in 3 years, but was a boy, so was called Henry John Brewster, born 1 Dec 1868 in New Wortley, Yorkshire for some reason. The birth was registered at Kirkstall in the January quarter of 1869. This family generally christened the babies in a bunch, and this happened on 5 May 1881 at St George the Martyr, Southwark, when he was 12, with his 3 younger sisters. As far as censuses go, he was at 61 Webber Row in 1871 aged 2, 15 Angel Place in 1881 aged 12, then in 1891 he didn't go to Scovell Road with the hatters, he can be seen at 55 Friar Street with brother Thomas and his family, working as a File Cutter (this road is now part of Webber Street). On 15 Apr the following year, at St Saviour, Southwark he married Susan Pittman, the daughter of another hatter (who may well have worked with his father, but was by now deceased). they were neighbours, he lived at 26 Hatfield Street, she at 36, and the marriage was witnessed by groom's father and bride's mother. This area is all office blocks now, sadly. By 1901 they can be seen at 70 Coldbath Street, ostensibly Greenwich, but more like Lewisham, with a son Henry. He had been born in Kennington, so they must have settled near family originally. Next son Albert was born soon after the census, then another, Frank 8 years later. So by 1911 census they had 3 sons and can be seen in the census literally around the corner (Google Maps says 279 feet away, but it is all modern housing now). Henry junior was 14 years old and working as a telegraph messenger for the Post Office, his father a metal grinder working on cars. In 1939 Register they had again moved a short distance, to Renbold Place. Now this is Renbold House, Blisset Street, fairly modern blocks. They had by then retired but sons Albert and Frank still lived at home and worked as "Kitchen Hands at the ABC", presumably a café/restaurant nearby. Susan died aged 69 in Jun 1941 and Henry in Jan 1946 aged 77. They were buried in Greenwich Cemetery


Friday 15th June 2018

Elizabeth Brewster2 was born Oct 1844 in Southwark to Thomas & Martha née Sellman and can be seen in 1851 census aged 6 with them at 5 Lower Swan Court, Christchurch, Southwark. In 1861 aged 16 she was at 14 York Place, Chelsea, working as a servant to a coal merchant and family, but in 1871 was back with her parents at 68 Webber Row, London Road, Southwark, working as a hat trimmer (Webber Street now, off The Cut). On 7 Sep 1873 at St Mary's, Lambeth she married workmate Henry Joseph Kelsey. I can see from the records that as a child he was in the Christchurch Workhouse, having been at the Norwood School (the Industrial School I mentioned on 5th June, see below), then being discharged to the care of his mother. He and Elizabeth had no children, but could be seen in 1881 census, living with his niece, who also worked with them. All of them were hat trimmers at the local factory, now a hotel called the Mad Hatter

Henry died in 1890 at 2 North Place, Southwark, aged 48. Hat-making was a very dangerous process, involving a lot of polluting chemicals including mercury; the phrase "Mad as a Hatter" comes from the neurological effects of this. After his death Elizabeth went back to her previous occupation and can be seen in 1891 census at 16 Kinross street, Bermondsey (now Tanner Street, off Tower Bridge Road), working as a servant/cook to a bricklayer & family. She died aged 55 in Jan 1900 in Lambeth.

Emma Brewster was her niece, born on 17 Oct 1871 in Southwark to brother Thomas Henry and Emma née Reseigh and christened on 5 May 1881 at St Paul's, Westminster Bridge Road with several siblings.

[photo taken 1907, church destroyed in World War 2]
In 1881 census she can be seen at 15 Angel Place, Southwark. This is a very interesting alley running alongside the site of Marshalsea Prison, made famous by Charles Dickens in Little Dorrit, and still exists as a path today:
1887
1926
2017
Thr "other side" there is now a garden:

As the sign says, the prison was closed in 1842, so 40 years before the time we are talking about

and in 1891 our family can be seen to have moved around to 135 Scovell Road and again worked at the hat factories

Scovell Road is the one that goes off the map on the right side of this map, under the word Costcutters, the Mad Hatter is off the top.On 1 Oct 1893 in Southwark she married Augustus Cornelius Kibble (isn't that a lovely name!), gas fitter, they settled in nearby Webber Street - see above map - and can be seen in 1901 census with 4 of their eventual 7 children at number 52 (even numbers now replaced with tower blocks). In 1901 all 7 children are there at 12 Brunswick Street, just around the corner from Webber Street, now called King James Street. The next time we meet them was in 1939 Register, when they had moved 6 miles west to Hammersmith, and can be seen at 22 Westwick Gardens

In this house at that time were 4 couples. Augustus described himself as "Press Tool Maker" and Emma UDD (unpaid domestic duties, in case you've forgotten). They were both 68 years old. Augustus died in 1948 and Emma in 1955, aged 77 and 84 respectively.

Her sister Helen Brewster was born 12 Sep 1873 in Southwark and was christened with Emma and 2 other siblings on 5 May 1881.
<to be continued>

Tuesday 12th June 2018

The Brewsters came into this tree when Susan Brewster, Cliff's great-grandmother, married Joseph Hodd.

Elizabeth Brewster was born in Dec 1797 in Roxwell, Esex, which is near Chelmsford, to William & Elizabeth née Clarke and christened there on 30 Dec. Apparently in about 1813 she married James Cutts, an "Ag Lab" from nearby village Great Waltham, although I cannot locate the event as it was pre-registration. They had 3 children, maybe more, and in 1841 census can be seen at Chignall St James with a lot of other Ag Labs. In 1851 the same place, with her father William, widowed, both he & James Ag Labs and Elizabeth a nurse.. By 1861 she was widowed and living with her daughter Sarah & family in Rivenhall, Essex, still nursing. 1871 census found her working as Housekeeper to a Robert Peate at Egypt Farm, Braintree Road, now near Witham station. In Jan 1873 she died there aged 75.

Friday 8th June 2018


William George Burley (William1's father) was born in Oct 1806 in Westminster to George & Sarah née Lavidge and christened on 9 Nov at St Geo in the East. On 4 Jul 1825 at St Mary's, Lambeth St Mary-the-Less for pic see Tuesday) he married Ann Childs from Melcombe Regis in Dorset. They had 7 children, all of whom we have met, and William George was a blacksmith. In censuses of 1841-61 they can be seen at 67 Broad Street with combinations of these children his mother Sarah, and in the latter also son William, grandson Joshua Gates, daughter Eliza and family along with various boarders. As he died of mouth cancer (!) aged 60 on 1 Oct 2864 at 67 Broad Street, Ann can be seen there with Martha & her family, James & his, Sarah & hers and also another family - this house must have been massive! Likewise in 1881 with Martha & family, James & family, then she died there in 1885 of chronic bronchitis.

William John Burley was born in 1817 in Westminster to Joshua & Sarah née Osborn. He was not present in 1841 census, but he was evidently in Ireland, as on 1 Feb 1843 at St Michael's, Limerick he married Eliza Deniher

It was a brand-new church at that time. As I said on Tuesday, Sarah Ann was born in Newcastle, but the family soon moved south and can be seen in 1851 in Vauxhall Walk with his sister Sarah & family, William (usually known as John) working as a labourer. But by 1861 they were at 9 Alma Road, Bermondsey with 2 daughters and John was an engineer. In 1871 & 1881 they can be seen living in Borough Road, in the latter he was a Master Engineer, employing 2 men & 1 boy

[see 26th May]
In 1891 they had moved with daughter Amelia to 43 Grosvenor Park Road
2014
In 1901 they were (still with Amelia) at 180 Grosvenor Terrace, just around the corner (pic above right). By 1911 Eliza had died and John can be seen at 460 Old Kent Road with Amelia and 2 boarders. If this building looked like this then, it must have been very modern and smart. Nowadays it is called "Family Life Christian Centre" and is a charity.

John died in Aug 1913 and was buried 27 Sep in Southwark.

That's the end of the Burleys. I have just one neglected branch to bring you, the Brewsters.

Tuesday 5th June 2018

Sarah Burley2 was born in 1826 in Lambeth to William & Ann née Childs and can be seen with them in Broad Street in 1841 census aged 15. On 22 Sep 1844 at St Mary's Lambeth she married Joseph Gates and they had 5 children. In 1851 census they can be seen at 13 William Street (now Whitgift Street), Lambeth with 3 sons, James working as a labourer at an iron foundry. This address became the Carpenters Arms shortly afterwards, but is now gone. His was obviously a tough job and Joseph died in 1858 aged 33. Sarah was left with 5 children under 12, so it is not surprising that she married again soon after, on 2 Oct 1860 at St Mary, Newington, to Robert Bartholomew Pert, 7 years her junior. With such an excellent name I have been able to trace his childhood in some detail. He was born in the St Martin's area of London in 1833 but his parents evidently could not look after him, so he was admitted to Castle Street Workhouse on 19 Oct 1840 at the age of seven, and, although the records show he was "sent to Norwood" (which was an Industrial School) on 30 Oct 1840 this does not seem to have happened and he remained at Castle Street until 26 May 1842.
1871
He was aged nine then, and was discharged into the care of his grandmother. Unfortunately I don't know her name or where she lived, so cannot track him down in 1851. By the time Sarah married him in 1860 he was established as a greengrocer/fruiterer and in 1861 census they can be seen at 26 Jonathan Street, Lambeth (just the other side of Broad Street, still exists but contains modern blocks) with 3 children (hers with Joseph). They had a daughter together, Ann Jane, in 1863 but unfortunately Robert died in 1874 aged 41. By this time the family had joined Sarah's brother James back at 67 Broad Street. However, when 1881 census came along Sarah, now 53, was in the nearby Workhouse Infirmary, where a few weeks later she died.

Sarah Ann Burley was born in May 1845 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne to William and Eliza née Daniher
and christened there at St Andrew's on 16 June. Why they were there at the time I do not know, but Eliza may have been staying with her parents or other relatives, as that was the way in those days. She came from Limerick, Ireland, so her family may have settled "Up North" and William brought her to London. In 1851 census they can be seen living in Vauxhall Walk, Lambeth with Aunt Sarah & family. Sarah Ann was aged 6 at this time, but I cannot find her in 1861; she is not with the family. The only other record I can find of someone by her name born in Newcastle and living in London is in 1881 census, a dressmaker lodging at 30 Wych Street, St Mary le Strand. It may sound far-fetched but she has with her a 2-year-old called May M Burley (a daughter? she was unmarried) and a visitor from Limerick, another lodger from Dublin and one from London Middlesex. A Sarah Burley died in Wandsworth in 1900 approximately the same age.

William Burley was born in 1837 in Lambeth - I have not seen the birth registration because it was only introduced that year and was not mandatory. I have just found the christening record - William, James, Elizabeth and Martha were all "done" on 7 Jan 1849, aged 12,11,8 and 6 respectively, at St Mary-the-Less church in Broad Street

In 1841 census and 1851 census he can be seen with the family in Broad Street, as described elsewhere, in the latter an engineer. On 19 Jan 1862 he married Charlotte Dupuis, daughter of a local policeman. In 1861 they can be seen at Park Street (now part of Sancroft Street), Charlotte working as a mantle-maker, her two brothers working in the pottery. Her father was invalided out of the police due to an accident, and was awarded a pension. However he ended his days at a Lunatic Asylum, which suggests it was a head injury or what we now recognise as PTSD. He was already an inmate at the time of the wedding, but appears on the record, so did give her away. After their marriage, William & Charlotte moved down to Portsea, where he worked as a Millwright, and they had 4 children there. In 1874 they returned to the south-east and had 3 more in Greenwich. In 1881 census they can be seen at 13 Strickland Street, Deptford (now numbers 9-16 are missing, possibly bomb damage in WW2) with 5 children and a lodger. In 1891 they had moved a short distance to 83 Pelton Road, Greenwich (now modern blocks) with 3 children and a boarder. Also in the house was another family Dupuis - I think daughter Charlotte married a relative of her mother, Cornelius, also a potter like her brothers. William & Charlotte remained at this address into the next census, but by then all the children had left.1911 told a disturbing story. William was living at 128 Westwood Road, Earlsdon, Coventry

with son Lewis and his family, but Charlotte can be found in Plumstead Workhouse. She may have been there for medical reasons (people often had to resort to this before the NHS formed in 1948), hopefully not related to her father's final years, as on the form she states she doesn't know how long she has been married. She died there in 1913 and William in Coventry in Jan 1928.


I am so sorry to have deserted you for almost a week. Lightning struck our telegraph pole, shorted out the router and left us with no wi-fi. Now at last I have set up the new equipment and we are off and running again.

Monday 4th June 2018

Martha Burley was born in Jul 1843 to William & Ann, in Broad Street, where she can be seen in 1851 census aged 8 with family and lodgers. On 31 Jan 1859 at St John the Evangelist she married Richard Owen, a hawker (salesman) and they had 4 children.

[although it says "full age" she was only 15. As you can see, she could sign her name, although Richard just "made his mark" and her parents were both illiterate, so maybe nobody knew - or would let on!]
In 1861 census she and Richard were shown visiting at 11 St Georges Cottages, Lambeth, which is just off Lambeth Walk, so a couple of streets away from her parents. By 1871 her father had died and Martha & Richard can be seen back at 67 Broad Street, with her mother & 3 children, also a lodger & his family. In 1881 they were still at 67 with her mother, also brother James and his family. By 1891 census they had moved to number 18, her mother had died, and they can be seen there with 2 children, a lodger & family, also an army pensioner & his 3 children. They then moved out of the area and can be seen in 1901 at 23 Golborne Road, just off Portobello Road, but when Richard died in 1907 his death was registered in Brentford area and Martha went to live with her daughter Eliza & family in Willesden, where she can be seen in 1911 census then died the following year.

Mary Burley was born in May 1850 at 9 Broad Street, Lambeth to William John & Eliza and christened at St Mary's (later known as St Mary-the-Less) on 9 Jun 1850 then can be seen in 1851 census aged 10 months, at Vauxhall Walk with her Aunt Sarah & family. Unfortunately she died in Apr 1852, just prior to her 2nd birthday.

Samuel Burley was born May 1815 in Westminster to Joshua & Sarah née Osborn, and christened there on 25 Jun 1815 at St John the Evangelist. I mentioned this record on Tuesday and the fact that it said Joshua was in the army, a fact I have not seen elsewhere.

Looking into this address, I was thrilled to find it was one of the sites used for filming the Harry Potter films. The lovely doorway into the optician's shop in what is now Bulls Head Passage, part of Leadenhall Market, was used as the entrance to Diagon Alley

The problem with him is that the records are scant and I cannot prove anything. There is a marriage on 5 Jun 1837 at St Martin-in-the-Fields to a Rebecca Jary, but I cannot find them 4 years later in the first census, or even subsequent ones. All I have tracked down in rate records is 1850 & 1851 he rented a house in Dorset Street, Marylebone, then 1857 & 1858 one in Drury Court, off Drury Lane, only a mile away, followed by a death in Oct 1858 in the Marylebone area. But without links to the rest of the family, or even censuses, I cannot take these seriously.

Sarah Burley1 is the link ancestor here, being the one who married into the Mays, and was Cliff's great grandmother. She was born on 30 Apr 1819 at Great Peter Street, Westminster to Joshua & Sarah and was christened at St John the Evangelist on 31 May. I am aware that we have met this church many times but I haven't outlined its history
1846
It was built in 1712-28 on a piece of land purchased from Henry Smith, Treasurer, so is often known as St John's Smith Square. It is Baroque but many people dislike it's style (I don't). In 1939 it was the venue for Randolph Churchill's wedding (son of Wiston), and functioned for 213 years as a parish church. However, it was gutted by enemy bombs in WW2 and rebuilt as a concert hall, which it remains to this day. In the crypt there is now a restaurant.

Anyway, I have told Sarah's story before, so refer you to 20 Jun 2014

Tuesday 29th May 2018

Now it is the turn of Joshua Burley, Sarah's father, who I had such trouble with last week. I have had a bit of a breakthrough, but this has ruined the generation above. I will explain. I managed to find his burial record

This was transcribed as "Barley" - you can see why. This gave me a date of birth in 1775 but confirmed the address given on Sarah's birth. I was subsequently able to find his marriage to Sarah Osborn and baptism of another child, Samuel, in 1815. All of this tallied and helped to build a picture of him, especially as I have been able to trace his movements through the Land Tax records. The only problem is that with this date of birth he was obviously not son of George born 1780 but probably brother. With all the Sarahs around this is difficult, as I found. It seems he was born in 1775 to parents unknown in place unknown, and was living in Cranbourn Street before his marriage. This is near St Martins-in-the-fields, where on 22 Aug 1803 he married Sarah Osborn (and if she is the one I suspect, her mother was called Sarah too!
) By 1809 he was paying rent at Lincolns Inn, half a mile away to the north-east, and this continued until 1817 at least. By 1819 when Sarah was born, they had relocated to Great Peter Street, which is back in Westminster, just across the river from Lambeth. Thus when he died in 1828 it was at 20 Peter Street, which is today a church and conference centre. He was buried at St John the Evangelist, which had only opened as a burial ground 5 years before, was closed 30 years later and is now a public garden.

[I was puzzled by the reference on his son Samuel's baptism (at St John the Evangelist church) in 1815 that he was a "soldier in the 3rd Regiment of Guards". Unfortunately the military records that I have access to don't go back that far]. Sarah probably died in 1821, when daughter Sarah was 2 years old, which is why she went to live with her uncle across the river and grew up in Lambeth with her cousins.

Monday 28th May 2018

Jane Burley was born Apr 1860 to William & Eliza née Daniher at 9 Alma Road, Bermondsey, where she can be seen in the census the following year
2016
As she was Eliza's sister, see Friday. In 1871 census she can be seen with the family at 96 Borough Road (the main road with the buses) and it may have been there that she died aged 12 in Oct 1872.

John Thomas Burley was born in 1834 in Broad Street to William & Ann and can be seen there with the family in censuses of 1841 & 1851 as previously described. On 29 Jun 1856 at St Mary's he married Elizabeth Smith and can be seen in 1871 census at 6 Parry Place, Plumstead with 2 sons and his sister-in-law. This area was run-down even then, I understand, and by 1871 they were back in Southwark, at 39 Union Road, Newington (formerly Horsemonger Lane and now Harper Road). They had 7 children in total. John was a Smith/Engineer/Fitter so there was plenty of scope for employment and his sons followed him too. In Dec 1887 his death record said he lived at 34 William street, Clapham, but I believe this was a mistake and he was at William Street, Newington, just 2 streets away (modern flats now). He was buried on 10 Dec 1887 in one of the reused graves in Lambeth Cemetery, Norwood.

Sunday 27th May 2018

Elizabeth Burley (not Elizabeth Hurley, as I keep reading this name) was born in April 1841 to William & Ann and appeared in the census a month later, then in 1851, both at 67 Broad Street. It seems that on 28 May 1860 (happy 158th anniversary tomorrow) she married William May Jr, brother of Thomas, who married Sarah. However, I cannot find them together (or apart even!) in subsequent censuses, and William was 29 years older than her, so it is not surprising he died 13 years later aged 61. He was the waterman I wrote about on 11th Jul 2016, but this doesn't fill the "hole" I referred to then. I think I can see her in 1891 census, 50 year old widowed mantle-maker, living in Walworth Road, but I can't be sure.

George Burley was Cliff's 3xgreat grandfather. Unfortunately, although I know he married Sarah Lavidge on 29 Sep 1805 at St Mary Newington, I know nothing of his origins. I had on my notes that he was born 1781 in Leicestershire, but I have no idea where that info came from as the only record I have is the 1841 census for the age and nothing for the place. Even that may be wrong, as he was staying at the Kings Head Inn, Southwark
1881
Ages in 1841 are notoriously misleading. They were always rounded down for adults, but even if only this were true he was only 9 years older than his son. After he died and was buried at All Saints, Wandsworth on 20 Sep 1848, Sarah can be seen in the next 2 censuses at 67 Broad Street with son William and family, where she died in 1865.

James Burley was born on 12 Aug 1838 to William & Ann in Broad Street. I had assumed that they remained at number 67, but his birth certificate states number 13 and he died at number 18. He can be seen on censuses of 1841 & 1851 with parents etc as I have said before, then on 14 May 1860 at St Mary's he married Ellen Miles Cantle from Southampton, and they had 9 children, but one died aged 2. In 1861 census the following year they can be seen at 21 William Street, Lambeth - this can be seen at the top of the map I posted yesterday, running parallel to Broad Street. They didn't stay there for long as by the next census they can be seen back at number 67, with his mother Ann, sister Martha & family, James a smith like his father, and 4 children, then in 1881 with seven. By 1891 they can be seen at 61 Newport Street, again just around the corner, and they evidently moved back to Broad Street, as they were living there at number 18 when James died on 8 Feb 1893 aged 54. According to electoral roll records Ellen remained at this address until 1901, when records end, and I suspect she is the "Eleanor Burley" who died in 1903. 1901 census shows her at number 18 with son Robert. She listed herself as "monthly nurse".

Saturday 26th May 2018

When "our" Sarah Burley was a child, her parents died and she went to live with her uncle William. Thus she grew up with her cousins, as if they were younger siblings and therefore I have studied this branch, despite them being "twice removed", as I said yesterday.
Eliza Burley2 was born 11 Feb 1831 at 7 Bull's Head Court, Westminster to William & Ann née Childs and christened there at St John the Evangelist Church on 14 Aug 1831. According to British History Online, there were 8 courts called Bull's Head. St John's was just behind Westminster Abbey, so the one where they lived must have been close by. Courts were essentially tiny so not often shown on maps. In 1841 & 1851 censuses she can be seen in Broad Street, Lambeth with parents and sibs. This road was very familiar to me in my childhood as it was part of what became Black Prince Road, very close to my grandparents' home in Kennington. I have touched on it many times in this blog, especially as Thomas May, who Sarah married, worked at the soapworks shown here
1868
1865
No. 67 was about halfway between the railway bridge over the road and the "factory/counting house" where the road turned into Princes Street - about where the "t" is on the map above. On 4 Dec 1853 she married Robert Chandler, an engine driver who had been born in Ipswich. In 1861 census they can be seen at 67 Broad street with her parents, brother, nephew, grandmother and now 2 children of their own. It must have been a squash and by 1871 Eliza & family have moved out. Her widowed mother Ann can be seen alone with her daughter Martha & family but also another family of lodgers and her brother James Burley with his family. I can't find Eliza & Robert with their children anywhere, but they pop up again in 1881. Eliza was by then 50 and Robert had changed occupation. They were living at 115 East Street, Walworth - my Dad knew it well as a market known as East Lane (for some reason) - and Robert was running a business as a corn dealer.
2016
[site of their house, which would have been the 3rd in, where the trees are]
Robert junior helped his father with his business, Eliza worked as a General Servant and Jane as a "Shop Woman". By 1891 they had resettled in Tabard Street, Southwark, less than a mile away, where great changes had been made to clear some of the slums in 1870s and again in the early 20th century, heralding the main roads and blocks that are there today. It was called Kent Road, and this part had been renamed Tabard Street in 1877, more familiar parts Old Kent Road and New Kent Road retain the names to this day. The household remained in 1901 census and Robert died there aged 83, then in Oct 1909 Eliza too, aged 78.

Friday 25th May 2018

Another of Cliff's great grandmothers was Sarah Burley, who married into the May family, which I covered in 2014 & 2016. When I was preparing this branch the other day, I managed to marry Joshua off to his mother (both wife and mother are called Sarah), which caused real tangles in the tree, as you can imagine! I think I have it sorted now. Of course, Joshua compounded the difficulty by calling his daughter Sarah as well! As usual, I shall tackle this family in alphabetical order.
Amelia Burley was born on 9 Apr 1865 in Southwark to Sarah's brother John (actually William John), thus making her - I am reliably informed - one of Clifford's 1st cousins twice removed. She never married and can be traced through censuses of 1871-1911, living with her parents in the Newington & Camberwell areas, working as a Cigarette Maker then looking after her father when mother died. Finally she can be seen in 1939 Register at 2 Nutcroft Road, Camberwell, aged 74 with Charles Skinner senior & junior and their wives. I can't say whether they were related and unfortunately houses that end of the road are long gone. She died there in Jan 1940.

Her sister Eliza Burley1 was born in Jan 1852 in Lambeth/Bermondsey and can be seen in census of 1861 aged 9 at 9 Alma Road, Bermondsey with parents and sisters, the father an engineer/turner, then in 1871 & 1881 in Borough Road with parents and sisters, working in the latter as an Envelope Folder. This may have been in a local warehouse or at home as piecework. In 1880 Directory, George is listed at 4 County Grove, Camberwell New Road

In the 1881 census Eliza was with her parents and 4 daughters and George at his parents' with his sister and her children. Both homes were in Borough Road, at 53 and 66 respectively. Eliza died on 20 Feb 1890 at Old Kent Road and was buried on 23 Mar in Newham Cemetery. The following year at the census George can be seen at 216 Southwark Bridge Road with his widowed sister-in-law Ann looking after his three girls with her 2 boys and I suspect she is the Annie he appears to have married by the time the 1901 census came around. She married his wonderfully-named brother Henry Goodhealth Shaw in 1875 and he died in 1889. In 1901 at 216 there were several working on his printing business - described as his "Own Account, on Commission"
[I have clipped this view from Google Streetview last year to show the area.

The building on the corner in the middle of the photo is the Duke of York pub, number 47, so 53 must have been alongside us here. Just beyond the railway bridge on the right side was 216 as the road name becomes Southwark Bridge Road. Number 96 is about 400 ft behind us on the other side of the road - I can't snip that due to large numbers of buses clogging the road at all times!] He died aged 80 in 1928.

I shall deal with the other Eliza tomorrow.

Tuesday 22nd May 2018

Nancy Frances Morrison was born 21 May 1815 (happy 203rd birthday yesterday) in Woolwich to John & Jane née Swan and baptised there at  the Scots Church (apparently St Andrews Scottish United Reform Church) on 4 June 1815


It seems from comments on the internet that this church had associations with Scotland and the Royal Artillery. Well, John was definitely in the Royal Artillery, as it says on the record above - although I don't know what the following letters mean, if you do, please get in touch - but he was from Kent, not Scotland. Anyway, after this Nancy seems to vanish. I have mentioned before that this name was interchangeable with Ann, Nan etc, so is always a difficult one. This is a shame after yesterday's productive searching for Margaret.

Robert Crawford Morrison was Margaret's brother, born to John & Isabella née Green on 16 Apr 1832 in Woolwich and christened at St Mary Magdalene on 11 May


He can be seen on censuses of 1841 at Powis Street with parents etc but by 1851 when they had moved to Westminster and set up the "?sweatshop", he can be seen still in Woolwich, lodging with James Nicholson, probably his employer, a tailor, at 75 King Street, Woolwich (the road where St Mary Magdalene stood). I can't find him in 1861 but his future wife was at 26 Little Windmill Street (now Lexington Street), just off Broad Street, where his sister Margaret lived. On 24 May 1868 at the Parish Church of St Marylebone he married Louisa Kentleton, local girl and artificial flower maker. In 1871 census they can be seen at 29 Carburton, a road just off Great Titchfield Street, with a baby son Robert Edward, but unfortunately he died aged 4 in 1875. In 1881 I see they were living at 37 Ernest Street, Pancras - in fact they were there in 1875 when the baby died. It seems there was another child who died, possibly Ann Elizabeth 1876-7 or Douglas Henry 1874-6 and, as I have said before, this kind of tragedy often results in relocation. So it wasn't with much surprise that I found in 1891 census they had moved out to Berkshire and can be seen at 1 St Mark's Place, Clewer. I can't bring you a photo, as the buildings there now are very modern. Unfortunately the move was too much for Robert and he died a few weeks after the census, aged 58.

Louisa can be followed through the next two censuses, firstly at 76 Grove Road, New Windsor, with no occupation

However, she managed to obtain an Alms House by 1911 and lived there until she died in 1919 aged 81. what a lovely place to spend your last days!

She then joined Robert in the cemetery shown above.

The only remaining twig on this branch is William Morrison, John's father, and his wife Margaret. They lived in Chatham in Kent and had John there in 1783, so I guess the William christened at Chatham on 7 May 1760 may well be him. However that is all - no marriage (I don't know where Margaret came from) and no deaths. I did think I had a death for William in 1846 but it turned out to be a much younger man.

Monday 21st May 2018

Margaret Morrison was Isabella's sister and thus Cliff's great great-aunt. She was born on 4 Mar 1840 at the house/?tailor's shop in Powis Street, then christened at St Mary Magdalene on 15 Apr. The following year she appeared in the census with parents, sibs, maternal grandmother from Scotland and another elderly lady. 1851 census shows her aged 11, living at 12 Cross Street with father, step-mother & step-siblings, also all the tailors I mentioned yesterday. On 31 Mar 1861 at St James, Westminster (where her father was buried 6 years before) she married William Robert Ash, himself a tailor and son of one

(you can see from the scan that Isabella was one of the witnesses for her sister). The census was taken a week later and shows them at 1 Richbell Place, Holborn, but by 1871 they can be seen with their 3 children back in Marylebone, near Cross Street, where she grew up. The area is nowadays known as Fitzrovia, and I just had one of those moments... the road they were living in was the one where my own mother worked when she was first married, 80 years later (and she worked for a tailor)! By 1881 they were even closer to her childhood home, as they can be seen at 32 Broad Street, just behind Cross Street (nowadays known as Broadwick Street, and the cafe currently there was only built in 2014, so I have no idea what it looked like 127 years ago). Broad Street was most famous as that where in 1854 John Snow had "discovered" cholera in the public water pump and subsequently the concept of epidemiology.

[John Snow broke the pump and so forced the residents to drink beer instead from the nearby brewery, whose customers rarely took ill]
The houses were all slums by contemporary accounts, and had no doubt been renovated or replaced following the epidemic. William, along with his eldest son also William, were trouser makers, Margaret a tailoress. They had 4 children with them at this time. William died there in Apr 1887 aged 48 (maybe he didn't drink enough beer!) and daughter Jessie aged 18 the previous summer. So the next census in 1891 showed Margaret had remarried - although I cannot locate a marriage record. She was now Margaret Foster, married to John Frost Foster (his mother's maiden name was Frost), decorator from Somerset. They can be seen in 1891 with Margaret's two remaining children along with her daughter-in-law and grandaughter, both Elizabeths at 40 Union Street, Marylebone. This was a turning off Great Titchfield Street, so named because it led down to the Workhouse, so now renamed Riding House Street
No 40
Margaret was listed as a tailoress, and as with all documents after her first husband's demise, she had knocked 3 years off her age (her new husband was 7 years younger than her). Her son William (whose age was only 14 years less than hers but nobody would question that, surely) also a tailor. In 1901 census John can be seen alone, a widowed carpenter at 19 Byron Street, Marylebone. This was near Regents Park, and I can see a lot of railway employees around him. Looking at a contemporary map, I see this area is now under railway sidings belonging to Marylebone Station. The only death record I believe may be his is in London Mile End. It is well out of his area (6 miles to the east), but Margaret died there too. I went to University there and there is a famous hospital there, the Royal London, so maybe they gravitated towards it at the end, possibly referred through the Union (Workhouse).

Sunday 20th May 2018

John Crawford Morrison was her father, born approx 1812 in Kent to John Morrison. There are several problems with this guy's records, the first being no baptism, but this is not unusual. The 1851 throws in a Red Herring in the shape of naming his birthplace as the Isle of Man! I don't know if this was a joke or what; the 1841 had stated he was born in the county of Kent, much more believable. On 17 Jul 1831 at St Nicholas, Deptford he married Isabella Green

They can be seen in census of 1841 at Powis Street, Woolwich with 3 children, as I said yesterday, but Isabella died there aged 38 and was buried at St Mary Magdalene on Christmas Eve 1848. By 1851 census John can be seen at 13 Cross Street, Westminster with "wife" Sarah, John's daughter Margaret and Sarah's children. The only marriage record I can find is dated 1853, so they were not legally married, but it is definitely them. Cross Street is now Ganton Street, off Carnaby Street, in Soho. Along with the family members as described, there were in residence 18 other tailors, a messenger and a servant. A fellow genealogist has suggested this was a "sweatshop or successful business" and it certainly seems that way. This was a famous area for tailoring, for example Savile Row is just around the corner. On the marriage record, the address for both John and Sarah is given as Drury Lane, this is one mile to the East, more famous as an area of theatres. John died in Feb 1855 and was buried on 6 Mar at St James, Westminster, not far from Cross Street

John's age was given on his burial record as 29, which would no doubt have pleased him as he was 43! (I have said many times before that ages on death records are not to be relied on - he was evidently a youthful corpse!) By 1861 Sarah can be seen to have moved to South Hackney, 5 miles away, lodging with a widowed nurse, working as a stay-maker. Again I cannot track down a census in 1871 or 1881 but I assume she stayed in Hackney as she died there in 1887 aged 79.

John Morrison Snr was born in Kent in Jun 1783 to William & Margaret and christened in Chatham on 25 July. On 22 Apr 1811 at St Margaret's, Rochester he married Jane Swan and they had 3 children. Son John, as I said above, was born in 1812, followed by Nancy & Donald and by the time the censuses started, John senior was widowed and living at the Royal Greenwich Hospital. This was a home for retired naval officers, not a medical hospital, so it wasn't strange to see he lived there for at least 17 years, died there aged 76 and was buried there on 6 Jul 1858.

Oddly, I cannot find Jane's death anywhere (maybe not really odd, as it was pre-registration) and no naval records for John. He is registered with war office registers for military service in 1830, but I cannot access the scans. This date would make sense, as Donald was born 1828 and was the last child, and by 1841 John was already a pensioner at Greenwich. I also found a burial for a Jane Margaret Morrison in that year in St Martin's in the Fields (her mother was called Margaret) but have since discovered that young lady was 15 when she died.

The London records are quite good, but not a patch on those of Cornwall - many thanks to the Cornish OPC and their tireless efforts.

Saturday 19th May 2018

Moving on through the great grandparents' trees as I am, next would have been the family of Charlotte, who married Cliff's great grandfather Herbert Henry Smith. However, I spent a fruitless afternoon yesterday trying to track down their marriage. His mother Jane never married his father, and this does (oddly) seem to run through families. So I have to drop Charlotte, which is a shame. All I know about her childhood is that she was born in Potterspury, Northants and she trainined as a lace-maker. There is a Charlotte Foster of the correct age, living in 1841 in Paulerspury (part of Potterspury) with her parents John (a mason) and Hannah and her sister Ann, but as I cannot link them by any documentation I can't pursue this family.

Cliff's other paternal great grandmother's name was Morrison, so I shall move onto her family. Isabella Mary Anne Morrison was born on 23 Dec 1833 in Powis Street, Woolwich to John & Isabella née Green. Powis Street was a shopping street even then, and still is today

She was christened on 19 Jan 1834 at St Mary Magdalene, Woolwich - familiar to us through all the baptisms, weddings etc of the Roffeys, the family she married into (see Aug 2014 & Aug 2016)
1840s
She can be seen in 1841 census at Powis street with her parents & sibs, her father a tailor. In 1851 she was around the corner at 1 High Street, working as domestic servant in the house of her future brother-in-law George Roffey. By 1861 George had died and she can be seen in Paddington with his widow & daughters, also a servant with her was her half-sister Margaret Shea. Strangely the 1871 census appears to be missing for all the family, and on 25 Nov 1867 at Trinity Church, Marylebone she married Manlius William Roffey and had 2 daughters. In 1881 they can be seen at 66 Priory Grove, Kennington, Manlius by then 60 and had retired from baking. This area was developed into a school and lost. The even numbered side is now a grassy park. The census of 1891 was exactly the same, but Manlius died a few weeks later, so in 1901 she can be seen living with her daughter Edith and family (Cliff's grandmother) in Clapham, Wandsworth, helping out by working as a laundress. she died there in Oct 1904 aged 71.

Friday 18th May 2018

William Trethewey was born in Dec 1768 at St Stephen-in-Brannel to Richard & Mary née Warne and christened there on 26 Dec. On 5 Jul 1806 at St Mewan he married Sarah Harper and they had 3 children, although Elizabeth, the first, died in infancy. By 1841 census they can be seen at Moorsplat, St Stepehns, living with son Richard & family but Sarah died the following year and William was still with them in 1851 census. I don't have any details, but he was admitted to Bodmin Lunatic Asylum and died there on 7 Feb 1853, buried 10 Feb.

William Trethewey2 was born Jul 1788 in St Stephens to Thomas & Jane and was christened there 4 Aug 1788. I cannot be sure, as I have no corroborating detail, but I suspect he married Joanna Trethewey on 12 Oct 1812 in St Dennis, had at least 7 children, with whom they can be seen in 1841 at Penrose, St Dennis, William working as farmer. The doubts I have is that there is another William born 1788 in St Stephens, a 1st cousin 4 times removed, who keeps getting mixed up in the records. There is a death in Oct 1842 and burial on 13 Nov at St Charles the Martyr, Plymouth. Why he would be in that part I don't know, which fuels doubts.

This completes the Tretheweys. Tomorow I shall move on to another lesser-covered branch on another tree.

Monday 14th May 2018

Thomas Trethewey5 was 4's son, 4th child of 11, born in Jul 1789 in Roche and christened there on 28 Jul, married in St Austell on 19 Apr 1819 to Mary Borlase (both parties signed, witnesses were Walter & Betsey Borlase). This family had a torrid time over the next 20 years, bobbing in and out of the church at Roche for christenings and funerals. They had 12 children, but lost 7 of them in infancy and then Thomas himself died aged 49 and was buried on 14 Mar 1839. Thus, once the censuses started, Mary was already widowed: in 1841 census she can be seen at Parkwoon, a shopkeeper, with 5 remaining children, then in 1851 with only daughter Betsey, helping in the shop. 1861 census tells it was a grocer's shop, but by then Mary was 67 and retired. Granddaughter Emma was looking after her, and the house can be seen to be next to the Victoria Inn. By 1871 she had moved to No 4 Trethurgy with son Jacob, now widowed too, gransdon William, daughter Betsey and her husband Nathaniel Dyer, also a retired grocer. She died there in the New Year 1874 and was buried on 11 Jan, aged 81.

The final Thomas Trethewey(6) was his nephew, born early in 1825 to Richard and Susanna née Snell in Roche, and christened there on 3 Feb. In Apr 1843 at St Austell he married Maria Pascoe. I cannot pin down the 1841 census, as his parents had died, although Maria can be seen at Pentivale with her parents. He may be with his uncle Thomas, but as they appear to have a son Thomas of the same age it is confusing. In 1851 I had a record, but appear to hav e the wrong one, again because of a couple by the same names living in Tresayes. 1861 & 1871 are correct, they were at Parkwoon with 4 then 8 children. Like his uncle Thomas they had a lot of children an lost several, but this time12 out of 14 survived. Thomas died in Sep 1879 and was buried on 21 Sep. Maria can be seen in census of 1881 with the 3 youngest children, but I can't find her in 1891. She seems to have been known sometimes as Maria, sometimes Mary, which doesn't help. She died in 1895 aged 75.

Saturday 12th May 2018

Robert Trethewey should be next, but as his son was born in 1634, I expect his birth to be 1610-ish and most records don't go back that far!

Samuel Trethewey was one of Jessie's 5xgreat-uncles, born Nov 1736 in St Issey to Richard2 & Jenifer née Harris and christened there on 28 Dec 1736. He possibly married Sarah Foley in 1736, as several other genealogists say, but as there is no father's name on the record and it was in Mylor, a town I don't know, I cannot swear to it. My database says he married a Mary, but I don't know where I got that from.

Thomas Trethewey1 was born (apparently, again I have not seen the record as it is so early) on 4 Mar 1634 in Roche to Robert and Ann née Burges, married Jane Pascoe and died in Roche in 1704.

His grandson was Thomas Trethewey2, born Oct 1688 to Richard1 and Ann née Martyn in St Stephens-in-Brannel and christened there on 14 Oct, was married there on 17 Dec 1708 to Elizabeth Rogers. They only had 4 children, but this was because Thomas died in Apr 1716 aged only 27. He was buried in St Stephens on 20 Apr 1716. As she had 4 children under 9, I suspect she was the Elizabeth Trethewey who married Lewis Billing in December of that year in St Stephens..

Thomas Trethewey3 was his nephew, born in Jan 1731 to Richard2 and Jenifer née Harris in St Issey and christened there on 30 Jan. The other record I have seen that may relate to him is a pass issued for a vagrant, picked up in London, to return him to the Bodmin area, where he belonged. I cannot fix it to him for sure, but it was dated 1765, when he would have been 34. He died in Jul 1794 aged 63 and was buried 3 Aug in St Austell.

Thomas Trethewey4 was his nephew, born in Jul 1759 at St Stephens to Richard3 & Mary née Warne and christened there on 5 Aug. On 4 Oct 1785 in Roche he married Jane Trethewey and they had 11 children. In 1841 census they can be seen at Tresayes, aged 81 and 76, with ?granddaughter Mary Ann as servant, and son Samuel and family next door. They both died at Tresayes in 1846 and were buried at Roche churchyard, Thomas on 13 Jun and Jane on 8 Jul.

Friday 11th May 2018

Working on Nancy Trethewey was somewhat frustrating, as I know Nancy was a variation of Ann, Nan etc and although I was told she was born in 1752 to Richard & Mary née Warne, I couldn't find any records except a possible marriage in 1847, when she would have been 95 years old - a rare thing indeed!

This stem contained 6 Richards, the first one Richard Trethewey1 born in 1662 to Thomas & Jane née Pascoe (I understand, I haven't had sight of the document), was married on 26 Nov 1687 in St Stephen-in-Brannel to Ann Martyn - both living in Lanivet at the time - and had seven children, although two (Ann and a Richard) died in infancy. When he died in Jan 1740 aged 78 he just had 4 sons left, Thomas having passed in 1716 aged 28. He left to John the house he was living in and some meadows, same to William, Richard a meadow adjoining and all his grandchildren a shilling each a year. His youngest son James was executor and was expected to keep his mother Ann, but as she died the previous year that was waived. Richard was buried 27 Jan 1740 at St Stephens churchyard.

Richard Trethewey2 was his son, second attempt at the name, a previous son born 1694 died in 1699. He was born in May 1700 and christened 15 Jun 1700 at St Stephens. On 27 Nov 1723 at St Issey he married Jenifer Harris and they had seven children. He died aged 63 in Mar 1764 and was buried 8 Apr at St Issey.

Richard Trethewey3 was his son, born in Oct 1728 at St Issey and christened there on 17 Nov. Exactly 25 years later, on 17 Nov 1753 at St Ervan he married Mary Warne and they had nine children. Richard died aged 89 and was buried on 22 Apr 1818 in St Stephens churchyard, joining Mary who had gone ahead on 30 May 1786 aged 56.

and he even made the local paper:


Richard Trethewey4
was their son (3rd child) born in 1756 in St Stephens. On 13 Jun 1779 in St Dennis he married Elizabeth Varcoe and they had seven children. He rented a property from one Mr Bellesworth (£1 10s 3d on 21 Mar 1798 for the year, according to the Land Tax document) but was living in Germoe by the time he died in Oct 1818 and was buried there on 24 Oct, followed 2 years later by Elizabeth. I don't know if his death and his father's were related, being only 6 months apart. It could have been some kind of epidemic, but I can't find anything online.

The "string" of Richards was continued by his son born 1779, grandson born 1805 and great grandson born 1835 but this branch then emigrated to Canada. Richard4's brother Thomas also produced a son Richard, who I have called Richard Trethewey5, from whom we are directly descended. He was born Nov 1787 in Roche and was christened there on 13 Nov. We have met him already several times as he firstly married Susanna Snell on 9 Nov 1811 at St Stephens, then Elizabeth Trethewey on 22 May 1827 in Roche after Susanna died in 1826. He had seven children with Susanna, but none with Elizabeth (she was aged 44 on marriage), including Jessie's great grandmother Jane. I suspect Susanna died in childbirth as last child Ann was born at the same time. Elizabeth no doubt came in to help bring up the babies - his children ranged from 14 to infant - but she died 7 years later in 1834 then he followed in 1836 and was buried on 10 Mar at St Stephens.

His son Richard Trethewey 6 was born 11 Mar 1823 in Roche and baptised on 20 Apr by the Bodmin Wesleyan Circuit. Brother of Jessie's great grandmother Jane, he can be seen aged 15 (18 really but rounded down as they did then) in 1841 census, working as a servant on a farm at Tregonhay, with the Stick family. On 23 Oct 1845 he married one of the family, Ann Stick at Roche Parish Church and they had seven children. They can be seen in 1851 census with two of these, running their own farm Polglaze, St Mabyn, of 120 acres and Richard employing 4 labourers, 3 of which lived in.
2013
In 1861 census they are still there, but now farming 130 acres, "employing 1 labourer & 1 woman", with 6 children and a general servant, then in 1871 158 acres, employing 2 labourers, with 7 children and 2 domestic servants. However, it must have been very hard work and Richard died in Mar 1878 at the Farm House, aged just 55. He was buried on 12 Apr at St Mabyn.

In 1881 census Ann can be seen running the farm, employing 2 men and a boy - possibly her children, and a domestic servant, but by 1891 she had retired to a cottage on Rose Hill, Lanivet, living alone "on her means" ie her savings and the same in 1901. The 1911 census return for her is interesting. She was by then 86 years old and her daughter Christiana widowed for a second time, so they can be seen with 2 remaining single daughters Emily & Ann, and a servant, in Albion Villa, Bodmin. I cannot locate it now, so it may be gone, but Christiana told us on her form that it had "12 rooms, including 4 attics", which sounds intriguing. Evidently a helpful sort, she also filled in that her mother had had 9 children, but by 1911 four of these had died. I can see that these were William aged 31, Thomas aged 50, James aged 8 and Helena aged 26. They stopped the string of Richards - fortunately for this blog, otherwise I'd be here all night!

Tuesday 8th May 2018

I have returned from spending time with the living members of my family trees, rather than the dead, and today am back with you and the Tretheweys.

Mary Trethewey1 was born on 25 Aug 1817 in Roche to Richard & Susan née Snell, 3rd of their seven, and christened on 28 Sep by the Bodmin Wesleyan Circuit. On 27 Aug 1836 she married tin miner Thomas Pascoe and they had 4 children, although daughter Jane died aged 7 and daughter Mary Jane was blind from birth. They can be seen in censuses of 1841 at Carbus with 2 children, then at Polgooth, where presumably Thomas worked at the famous mine (apparently the richest in UK).

[remains of Polgooth mine, now gone]
By 1851 they had 3 children and a lodger. In 1861 the same details, then in 1871 the address was given as Tregongeeves, a farmhouse on the northern edge of the village, still in existance but nowadays converted to holiday cottages:


[Polgooth Wesleyan Chapel, photographed 1955].
Thomas died in 1876, so in 1881 census Mary and Mary Jane were left at Polgooth, Mary an annuitant (living on interest from savings), and remained the same in 1891. Mary herself died in Oct 1893 and Mary Jane went to live with her nephew in Camborne.

Mary Trethewey2 was daughter of Thomas & Jane but died aged 3 in 1790.

Mary Trethewey3 was daughter of Richard & Mary née Warne, born in Aug 1754 at St Issy, Jessie's 4x great aunt, christened there on 22 Aug. On 28 Oct 1775 at St Stephen-in Brannel she married Anthony Trudgian and they had 9 children, although the first two, both also Mary, died in infancy. As Mary lived to 85 years of age, she appeared briefly in the censuses; in 1841 she can be seen with her daughter Elizabeth, living in Bank Street, St Austell, a matter of weeks before she died.

Mary Anne Trethewey - or sometimes Marianne - was born Jul 1802 in St Stephen-in-Brannel, penultimate child of Thomas & Jane, another of Jessie's 3xg aunts. On 23 Apr 1825 in St Stephens she married Thomas Richards, clay agent, and they had 9 children. By 1841 census they had lost two, so can be seen at Stenalees with 7 children, a servant and two grandfathers, who were living on their own means. By 1851 there were just the parents & children, all the males working as labourers at pit or farm (except Richard who was only 9). By 1861Tthomas had 4 sons at home and working; they can be seen, still at Stenalees, Richard a flour dealer, and a house servant. 1871 census is interesting, as at Stenalees there are four consecutive households from this family. Thomas died in January, so Marianne can be seen living with son Joseph and his wife, Thomas Junior next has a wife, 6 children and niece, then Richard can be seen running a mill with wife, 2 sons & a servant, followed by James who has wife and 5 chidren, running a grocery/draper's shop. Mary Anne died on 11 Mar 1873 aged 70, so we will leave this branch here.

Friday 20th April 2018

Sorry for the hiatus - I've been working on a private "commission" for a friend.

John James Trethewey
was James' brother (the one who married Frances Knight - see 12th April) but also married another relative, this time another Trethewey, and so complicated the links (Ancestry calls him the husband of Jessie's great great aunt).I dealt with his wife Elizabeth on 7th April - see below. He was born in Apr 1821 at Germoe and christened there on 6 May, parents Thomas & Elizabeth née James. He can be seen in census of 1841 at Ashton, Breage
1910
aged 20 with his parents & sibs, his father a tin miner. On 9 Nov 1850 at Calstock Parish Church he married Elizabeth
1904
and they had 3 children. In 1851 census they were at Albaston, Calstock, John a copper miner and Elizabeth a dressmaker

In 1861-1891 he can be seen at 5 Sims Terrace, Gunnislake, firstly a tin & copper miner, then invalided, blind and deaf and after 1871 when widowed, living with his daughter Susan and her family.

He died aged 70 on 19 Mar 1892 and was buried on 24 Mar at the church shown above.

Joseph Trethewey was born in Mar 1734 in St Issey to Richard & Jenifer née Harris and christened there on 29 Apr but I cannot fix anything further to him. There is a marriage on 23 Jun 1760 in St Stephen-in-Brannel to a Caroline Rickard, but no indication this is our Joseph. A fellow genealogist has given death date as 30 May 1786, but I cannot locate that record.

Loveday Trethewey was the youngest of the 11 children of Thomas & Jane, born 11 Jun 1804 at St Stephen-in-Brannel and baptised there on 6 Aug. On 7 Mar 1830 in St Dennis, she married Nicholas Kent, a shoemaker from that village. Both witnesses were evidently his relatives and the record says "with consent of parents", which is odd as Loveday and Nicholas were 25 and 23 respectively. In 1841 census they can be seen at Little Tregargas, St Stephens with 5 children
1905
They remained there over the next 4 censuses, although Nicholas died in 1865, leaving Loveday with Louisa, 3rd of their 8 children. Loveday died on 10 Nov 1882 at Trethosa Downs, another hamlet to the north of St Stephens. In 1861 census Nicholas was described as "shoemaker & Christian local preacher", the children all baptised as Wesleyans, so they no doubt frequented the Trethosa Chapel:

Loveday was buried on 13 Nov 1882 at Churchtown Cemetery, St Stephen-at-Brannel, featured at the top of this page.

Saturday 14th April 2018

Jenifer Trethewey2 was born in June 1741 at St Issey to Richard & Jenifer née Harris and christened there on 18 July

She returned to the sae church on 6 Jul 1766 to marry John William and they had 3 children, each christened at that church, and when she died she was buried there on 7 Jun 1827 with John, who had gone ahead in 1814.

John Trethewey1, Jenifer1's brother, was born 10 Apr 1790 at St Stephen-in-Brannel to Thomas & Jane. As I cannot locate a baptism record for him, nor a marriage, the next we hear of him is his death & burial. He died on 17 Nov 1866 and was buried 3 Dec, aged 76. He was a grocer & shopkeeper at "Union Road near St Austell" and left effects to his cousin John Trethewey Richards (son of aunt Ann Warne Trethewey), who worked with him.

John Trethewey2 was the 5th child of Richard & Mary née Warne, and thus Jessie's 4xgreat uncle, born May 1762 in St Stephen-in-Brannel and christened there on 5 June. He returned to the same church on 19 Mar 1786 to marry Elizabeth Parkin and they had nine children (but 2 died as children).John died aged 82 at Gonnamarras, St Stephens and was buried on 31st. Elizabeth followed 4 years later at the same age.

Friday 13th April 2018

I have already covered Jessie's great grandmother Jane - see 26th March - but her grandmother was another Jane, who I shall call Jane Trethewey2. She was born 1 Oct 1764 in Roche to parents with lovely names: Humphrey Betty Trethewey and Blanch Hendra. She was baptised on 5 Nov 1764 at St Stephen-in-Brannel but they lived in Roche and when she married on 4 Oct 1785 it was at the parish church there and was to Thomas Trethewey, son of Richard & Mary née Warne (brother of Elizabeth3) and they had 11 children together. They were still alive when 1841 census was held, living at Tresayes wirh a ?granddaughter looking after them. In the next household, probably next door, was their son Samuel, whose wife Mary née Snell had died in 1835, and he remarried - to another twig on our tree, Betsey Manhire, sister of the George who married Jane1. This happens a lot in country families! They can be seen at Tresayes in 1841 with 6 of their 8 children. Both Jane and Thomas died in 1846, he on 11 Jun and she a few weeks later on 5 Jul, both then buried in the churchyard at Roche.

Jenifer Trethewey was their daughter, 8th of the 11, born 10 Apr 1979 in Roche and christened there on 23 Apr 1797. On 13 Dec 1820 there she married Robert Goudge, but both her husband and her baby daughter Blanch died in 1822 (there was a lot of smallpox, influenza and cholera around at this time, it may have been an epidemic). Jenifer remarried on 4 Nov 1824, to Samuel Robins, local bachelor, and they had 5 children. In 1841 census they can be seen at Hendra, Roche with 2 daughters, Samuel a Mine Agent, then in 1851 at Rock Cottages with 2 children and a se
rvant,
Samuel described as a "china clay merchant employing 16 men, 2 boys and 2 girls" - sounds impressive. It is even more so when you see the next census document, as it states that he had been deaf for 40 years! They seemed to have semi-retired (Sam was 65) and were living in a lodge at the gates of Buckfast Abbey.

[This has now been renovated and functions as a conference centre] He died in 1870 so Jenifer went to live with her eldest daughter Elizabeth Stick, who ran a drapery & grocer's shop in Parkwoon, and, although in 1871 census she was visiting daughter Charlotte & family in St Issey, she can be seen at Parkwoon in 1881 & 1891. She died there on 8 Oct 1892 aged 95 and was buried in St Gomonda's churchyard in Roche:

[in case you cannot see, it says: In loving memory of Jenifer Robins born Apr 10th 1797, died Oct 8th 1892, also of Paul Robins died Dec 17th 1834 aged 1 year 9 months, Thomas Trethewy Robins died May 17th 1844 aged 13 years. Also of Samuel Robins, husband and father of the above late of Rock Cottage in this parish, who died and was buried at Bodmin May 2nd 1870 aged 75]

Thursday 12th April 2018

The next Trethewey on the list is a link between branches. James Trethewey is familiar as the husband of Frances Knight. He was born in Breage, Cornwall in Nov 1825 to Thomas & Elizabeth née James and can be seen with them in 1841 census at Ashton, Breage, his father a miner. He followed suit and after marrying Frances can be seen with her, 2 daughters and a lodger in Sydenham Village, Devon, working as one himself. In 1861 he actually lived on site at the mine Wheal Maria (No. 4 Wheal Maria Cottages), Tavistock and was mining copper. There were 5 children and a servant at home, as eldest daughter Mary Jane was living with her grandparents. James was listed as a widower, and I can now see that Frances died early in 1860, having her 6th child, Emma, who followed her not long after the census was taken. James married Honor Doidge very soon after and she can be seen with him in censuses of 1871 & 1881 still at No 4, in the latter a family of Doidges were at No 8, possibly Honor's brother. As Honor died in 1882, in 1891 James would be shown as widower again, living in Tavistock, as that is where he died in 1894, but the only possibility I can locate is a father James living with daughter Mary Jane. The writing is atrocious but appears to say their surname is "Trate", and he was born in Devon. But it could well be them.

[Wheal Maria Cottages 1964. Nos 17-20 shown, so No 4 would be to the left]

Sunday 8th April 2018

Elizabeth Trethewey3 was born in Oct 1765, 6th child of Richard & Mary née Warne, and christened at St Stephen-in-Brannel on 27th Oct 1765. She returned to the church on 6 Oct 1787 to marry William Richard Pinch and they settled in Roche and went on to have 9 children. William died at Tregonhay, Roche in Dec 1829 and was buried on 2 Jan 1830 at the churchyard. Elizabeth joined him on 17 Mar 1843, dying at Broad Lane aged 77 of old age. She can be seen there on 1841 census, living with son Richard, a Clay Labourer and daughter Mary, housekeeper, described as a "poor widow".

Florence Trethewey
was born 3 May 1821 in Roche to Richard & Susanna née Snell (Elizabeth1's sister) and baptised on 3 Jun 1821 by the Bodmin Wesleyan Circuit. On 21 Mar 1839 in Roche she married miner George Hawke and they had 12 children. In 1841 census they can be seen at Tresayes Lane, Roche with baby Ann, then 1851 at Colevreath with 5 children. In 1861 they were at the same place, now with 8 children, but George had changed his job. He was listed as "greengrocer", then in 1871 at Pentivale as "potato dealer". 1881 showed some changes as George died in 1880, so Florence can be seen with daughter Clara and her family, also 2 sons and a daughter-in-law. In Jul 1880 Clara had married next-door-neighbour Richard Hancock and can be seen in the census, taken 3 Apr 1881, when she must have been 5 months pregnant. She gave birth to a daughter Beatrice Clara on 23 Aug 1881 but did not survive and was buried 16 Aug 1881 in Roche churchyard. She was only 22.
Beatrice Clara Hancock in later years
So in 1891 Florence can be seen at Tresayes living on her savings with grand-daughter Jannie as domestic servant and Richard Hancock had remarried but was still living close by. Florence died aged 71 on 8 Jul 1892 at Tresayes and was buried with George in the churchyard on 11 Jul.

Elizabeth3's youngest sister Honor Trethewey was born in Jul 1774 at "Cregavause", St Stephen-in-Brannel (presumably a house, but no records of this exist) and christened on 8 Aug 1774. She returned to the church on 16 Jul 1795 to marry William Truscott and they had four daughters and possibly another son and daughter. What has confused me here is that Honor is sometimes heard (and transcribed) as Johanna, and Ann is sometimes written down as Nancy. I have a couple of wills for William, which mention a combination of these. Also, although they can be seen in 1841 census at Higher Gold Vanna (?), St Stephen-in-Brannel, William a carpenter, daughter Betsey Pucky and family and a possible granddaughter Jane Truscott Williams, I cannot find any of them in 1851. They may have been in St Dennis, as that was where William ostensibly died the following year. But an alternative for Honor appeared in the local paper in 1850:

which suggests a death before 1850 for William. There was a burial in 1849, age given as 75 and residence at St Stephens.

Saturday 7th April 2018

There are three Elizabeths in this tree:
Elizabeth Trethewey1 was born 20 Nov 1813 in Roche to Richard & Susanna née Snell, the 2nd of 7, and thus one of Jessie's great great-aunts. She was christened on 20 Dec 1813 at Bodmin Wesleyan Chapel - the one that is now a Wetherspoons see 26th March. I cannot find her in 1841 census, nor her future husband, John James Trethewey, but they married on 9 Nov 1850 in Calstock. In 1851 census they can be seen at Albaston, Calstock, Elizabeth a dressmaker, John a copper miner. By 1861 they had 2 children at home (eldest son Thomas lived with his grandmother in Roche) at Gunnislake. 1871 showed the address was 5 Sims Terrace, Gunnislake, Elizabeth still a dressmaker but by then John was an "invalided miner". Elizabeth died in Dec 1871 at home, aged 58, so in 1881 & 1891 censuses John can be seen at the same address with daughter Susan and her family. In 1881 he was blind and in 1891 blind and deaf. He died 1892.

[Gunnislake 1874]

[Sims Terrace from the rear 2017]

Elizabeth Trethewey2 was Blanch2's sister, another great great aunt, born 6th of the 11, in May 1791 in Roche and was christened there on 17 Jun 1791. On 23 Apr 1814 she returned to marry Joshua Thomas and they had 4 children. 1841 census found them at Killyvreath/Colevreath with daughter Elizabeth and 2 servants. They were still there in 1851 & 1861 (but Elizabeth had married and moved on), next door to son Reuben and his family. Joshua retired from farming in 1849, when he was 65, died at Rees Hill, Roche on 2 Oct 1864, and was buried in the churchyard on 5 Oct, along with Elizabeth, who had died at Colevreath the previous year and was buried there 22 Apr 1863. He left effects worth less than £300 to sons-in-law Edward Dyer and Joseph Higman.

Friday 6th April 2018

I'm back! Pressing on with the Tretheweys

Benjamin Trethewey was born in Feb 1739 to Richard and Jenifer née Harris and christened at St Issey on 9 Mar 1739. He was the 6th of their 7 children and Jessie's 5xgreat-uncle. On 17 May 1762 in St Breock he married Elizabeth Woolcock and they had 8 children (although I cannot prove the middle five, as they were born in Devon and my baptisms come from Cornwall. My information on the Devon babies was obtained by a fellow genealogist from the Trethewey Society, who presumably run a One-Name-Study). They moved back to Cornwall for the final two babies but Benjamin died on 30 May 1786 at St Stephen-in-Brannel, aged 47, Elizabeth followed only 6 years later. Thomas, the youngest, was only 5 years old when his father died, 10 when his mother did, but as Richard, the eldest, was by then 30 he was no doubt looked after.

There are two Blanch Tretheweys in this tree. The first was Jessie's 5xgreat aunt, sister of Benjamin, born Oct 1724 and christened 23 Nov 1724 at St Issey. She was unmarried when she died aged 67 in Jun 1792 at St Issey and was buried at St Stephen-in-Brannel on 2 Jul 1792. In case you have not realised, it is this churchyard that features on the top of each page here.
Blanch Trethewey2 was the child of her nephew Thomas, who may have named his daughter after her, as she was born 6 years after her death. She was Jessie's 3xgreat aunt, born Aug 1798 in Roche, 9th of the 11 children of Thomas & Jane. On 22 Oct 1826 in Roche she married Joseph Lawry and had six children with him defore he died on 3 Oct 1839 and was buried in the churchyard in Roche on 6 Oct, when his youngest son, Walter, was only a few months old.

Blanch continued to bring up her children alone, and only re-married in Jan 1859 when they were all supporting themselves. She married widower William Cock, a merchant, in Jan 1859 in Tywardreath, where they were both living. He had just one daughter from his first marriage, Angelina. Following the censuses, Blanch can be seen in 1841 at Trefonhay, Roche, a widowed farmer with 4 children and 3 servants (the scan is so bad I cannot tell whether they were farm workers or house servants). Again in 1851 she is described as Farmer, this time of 40 acres and with 3 children and a house servant. By 1861 she had joined William at Burney, and can be seen with him and one house servant. He was described as a "China Clay Stone Agent employing 8 men, 10 boys and 6 girls". 10 years before, he had been living at Burney with his first wife, Priscilla née Moss, only 2 houses from Richard and Martha Manhire, not so odd really, as it was Blanch's niece Jane who married a Manhire around this time and thus linked the families). In 1871 Blanch had been widowed again and can be seen at Parkwoon, Roche, retired, living with daughter Jane Trethewey Cock, a 35-year-old schoolmistress. It was the same in 1881 but this time next door to John & Maria Manhire. When she died, in Oct 1884, aged 86, she was living at Pendean Mills (Pendean was a tiny hamlet, part of Roche, comprising 3 tenements and a mill) and she was buried at the church in Roche on 19 Oct.

Tuesday 27th March 2018

As I found so many on this branch yesterday I shall continue as usual alphabetically. Jane had six siblings and her father Richard had ten. I shall try not to move too far afield, as Jane herself is Jessie's (my mother-in-law - this is her tree)
great great grandmother and this tree goes a long long way back. Richard's father Thomas not only had 12 children, he also married one Jane Trethewey, just to add to the confusion! Following the very excellent Cornwall baptism records available, I have traced this tree back to the Robert Trethewey who was Jessie's 8xg grandfather, born around 1610ish. Unfortunately, they appeared to be fixated on the same bunch of names and repeated them again and again!
Ann Trethewey was born Jan/Feb 1826 at Tresayes, Roche to Richard and Susanna, Jane's youngest sibling. Tresayes used to be a quarry but is now a nature trail:

As there are six Richards in this tree, I will call him Richard2, as my genealogy database (in its infinite wisdom!) calls him. She was christened on 23 Feb 1826 in Roche. By the time of the 1841 census she was 15, and can be seen lodging on a farm in (what looks like) Little Tregoning, Newlyn, St Columb Major. By 1851 her father had married for a third time and she can be seen living with them at St Austell Road, Roche. On 16 Oct 1853 she married William Edyvean, tailor, from Tresayes, where she was born, his father John a tinner there. In 1861 they were living at Tresayes with daughter Eva (aged 6 by then), with Trethewey families either side of them. In 1871 they had moved into larger premises and now had 3 boarders staying, one probably employed by William in his tailor business. In 1881 he had trained up daughter Eva as a tailoress and they can be seen living next door to the Rectory - this may well be the same place; there is a modern estate on this plot nowadays. Ann died in Aug 1885 at Churchtown, aged 59 and William died aged 63 in 1889. In the next census. Eva was working as a Housekeeper in Lanivet.

Ann Warne Trethewey was born 26 Dec 1771 in St Stephens-in-Brannel to Richard3 and Mary Warne and christened there on 19 Jan 1772. On 3 Jun 1793 she married John Richards and they had seven children. By the 1841 census John can be seen living with a family of Richards and John Trethewey at Stenalees. I can't track Ann down at this point and when John died in 1847, there is a record for her burial too at St Stephens. I cannot see the stone, but this may be why, as a transcription of the inscription may well have included her on the same date. She can clearly be seen though - along with her very useful middle name - in censuses of 1851 & 1861 at Trethosa Cottage, Trethosa Mill, St Stephens, with her son William and his family, living on Independent Means. He ran a grocer's shop and also in 1861 farmed 30 acres too. She died in Apr 1861 aged 89 and was presumably buried with John at St Stephens cemetery.

Monday 26th March 2018

Onwards now to another neglected branch, Jessie's paternal great grandmother Jane married George Manhire. When I first studied this tree, I had her down as Hewitt, but last year discovered she recorded herself on the children's birth registrations as née Trethewey, so I am happy to go with that (the name Hewett came from a mistranscription on the 1881 census - which I have reported to Findmypast). As I said when covering George on 20 Mar 2017, in 1841 census she called herself Mrs Manhire as they had a child, Susanna, (who I now see was named after Jane's mother). The marriage shown on the Cornwall OPC site from Parish Registers last year is no longer there, so I shall just say they may have been married prior to 1837 when registration was introduced and the record has been lost. She was born on 18 Aug 1812 in Roche and christened on 10 Sep 1812 in the Wesleyan Chapel in Bodmin (which is now incidentally the local Wetherspoons - and very nice it is too!)
1900
I told the rest of her story last year with George. The only new thing is her death record:

She was buried the next day at Treverbyn

I am trying to sort out her family. Originally I thought there weren't many in her tree, but have had one of those breakthroughs that opens the floodgates. It is made more difficult by the fact that a couple of her female relatives married Tretheweys too.

Saturday 24th March 2018

I hope the branch of my other paternal great grandmother will be more fruitful than yesterday. Again, I covered grandfather's paternal family, the Hennigs, in 2013 & 2015, but not that of his mother, the Krumreys. I don't know how many new German records are available, but as I haven't mentioned them here before, except in passing, I should be OK.
Unfortunately, as I have said before, I don't have access to many German death records, so these stories are somewhat truncated, and hard to set in order.
As usual, I shall deal with the family members I have located in alphabetical order. This means starting with Henriette's brother Carl Gottlieb Krumrey. So I had a shock right at the start because once I found his date of birth I discovered he only lived for two days! I can't imagine what an emotional Christmas that must have been! The reason this information came to light was the church records were not written up until after the holidays, when both birth and death were noted on the burial notice. He was born on 22 Dec 1801 in Prenzlau, died on Christmas Eve (a hugely important day in Europe) and buried on 26 Dec at St Sabine, Prenzlau.

(Although the centre of Prenzlau was flattened in WW2 the church survived)

Great great grandma Henriette Wilhelmine Krumrey herself was next, born 4 Jul 1803 in Prenzlau to Carl Ludwig Krumrey, burger, and Juliane Florentine Gottschalk (sometimes known as Justine) and christened 15 Jul 1803 at St Sabine (see above). On 5 Oct 1824 in Berlin she married Johann Christian Hennig and they had 3 children. On her death record it states she was 32, but as it was 14 Dec 1833 she was actually only 30. She was buried 18 Dec 1833 in Berlin.

Oops, I have slipped out of alphabetical order. Next should be their father Carl Ludwig Krumrey, born in 1772 (although where and exactly when has not emerged, nor his parents' names). On 13 Nov 1800 he married Juliane Florentine Gottschalk at St Nicolai, Prenzlau, which dates from 1275 but has been rebuilt several times - here shown on a post card:

They had 4 children, the first Carl above, died in infancy, the second was my great great grandmother, also see above. Unfortunately I know no more about Carl or Juliane.

Christian Krumrey was Carl Ludwig's father, but that's all I know (his name was on the marriage record, but no more).

There were two babies born to Carl and Juliane called Justine. Justine Elisabeth Krumrey was born 12 Apr 1808 and christened on 1 May, but died at 6 months on 4 Nov 1808. She was buried on 6 Nov at St Sabine. Justine Sophie Charlotte followed on 27 Oct 1809, christened 16 Nov 1809 at St Sabine, but there was another heart-breaking discovery: she died aged almost two on 30 Jul 1811, buried 1 Aug, again at St Sabine.

Wilhelm Friedrich Gottlieb Krumrey did survive and had an interesting story - in a way. He was born 11 Nov 1805 in Prenzlau and christened 26 Nov at St Nikolai above. In 1832 at St Sabine he married Christine Friedrike Henriette Henkel and had 8 children with her. Unfortunately at least two died in infancy and Wilhelm died on his 40th birthday 11 Nov 1845. He was buried at Prenzlau and Christine married a local baker called Eduard Julius Gothan, with whom she had 3 more children (who all survived). In 1855 Christine and Eduard took their remaining 6 children to Jackson, Michigan, where they settled. Christine died in 1889 aged 82 and Eduard in 1896 aged 77.

Well, that was an odd day, full of peering at 200-year-old documents written in loopy German, sometimes only able to pick out the names. Tomorrow, another branch altogether, on another tree.

Friday 23rd March 2018

Before I resume here, I would like to say we saw my mother off in style yesterday. It was lovely to meet up with many I hadn't seen for years, except through this site, as well as the usually family crowd.
Kathleen Matthews née Gamble 13 May 1932 - 23 Feb 2018 R.I.P.
1948  2011

I shall continue to update those branches of the trees that have been covered less than others. Another of my paternal great grandmothers was Emily Ann Parker and I covered that family in 2014 and 2016, but her mother was Ann Denny Cooley, and, despite having such a wonderful name, I haven't researched her branch at all. However, today I didn't get very far with her. All I know is that she was born in about 1821 and she had a sister, possibly twin, Maria. By 1881, when the sisters were living together, they both said they were widows, but I cannot find a marriage for Maria, apparently to a Mr Lucas. The middle name Denny crops up in a John Denny Cooley, who was father of an Ann, but as the birth dates are nearly 20 years apart, I suspect there is another Ann in a generation between them. Unfortunately there are far too many unknowns here, so I cannot go on.

Monday 19th March 2018

Richard Ingram
- see 15th May 2016 - George & Jemima's 9th and final child. Baptism:

and marriage:

Witnesses can be seen to be his brother James and wife Sarah, and the fact he (Richard) is described as a waiter suggests he was in service somewhere in 1841. As I have said before, his employer would give the information to the census-taker, and many would not know the first name of their employees. Of course, this is not helped in 1841 census by the rounding-up of ages. I was also unable to find anything relating to his death in newspapers, as 1853 is missing in the Findmypast database.

Sarah Ann Ingram - see 17th May 2016 - I have a scan of her baptism:

I also re-examined 1939 Register and the closed file has been opened. It wasn't a servant, it was Hubert's daughter (not Herbert, but the writing was debateable) born 23 Nov 1917, married 25 Jan 1940 in Hull to a man with the impressive name of Heigham Owen Jarvis. In 1939 she was listed as UDD and presumably looked after Sarah Ann, then married when she died.

Sarah's father William Ingram - see 18th May 2016 - the scan of his baptism:

shows that on the same day was baptised one Eliza Whittick, probably a cousin. I cannot locate a scan of his first marriage in 1842 but his second:


His son William Henry Ingram's baptism:

As he emigrated in 1865, before the shipping passenger lists begin, I cannot track him down on the journey. However, he appeared in 1870 aged 23, already a "surveyor of lumber" (I hadn't found this census before, as he was down as "Ingraham").

Sunday 18th March 2018


Back to the Ingrams.
James Ingram - see 10th May 2016 - nothing new
James Henry Ingram - the account on the same day 2016 was very detailed indeed
, but all the scans are now available:



and we can see that James' parents witnessed both marriages.
Jane Ingram, his daughter, was likewise very detailed in 2016, and again I fortunately now have the scans to show you:


Jane Ingram 2 - see 11th May 2016 - unfortunately I cannot find a baptism for her. It eems that William and Jane only got round to baptism for William, not Jane or George. As she didn't marry, I have no news certs.
My great great grandmother Jemima Ingram - see 11th May 2016 - I now have sight of the baptism scan and notice she was christened with a John Whittick, who could be a cousin.

I cannot find anything new after this.
Maria Lewis Ingram - see 16th May 2016 - baptism

banns


Saturday 17th March 2018

As it is St Patrick's Day, and there have been a lot of new Irish records released, I have decided to suspend the Ingrams for today and concentrate on the Irish part of this tree.
As you know, my paternal grandmother Florence Hennig's mother Catherine was born in Ireland in approx. 1840. I have now found her baptism 28 May 1839 at St Finbarr's, Cork and this gives her parents as James Noonan and Catherine née Hyde, the ceremony performed by Rev Alex Mahoney and sponsors (god-parents) Patrick Riordan and Bridget Callaghan.


Now, having found St Finbarr's it wasn't difficult to pinpoint her parents' marriage there on 24 Sep 1826. Beautiful place!



Unfortunately, although someone at the archive has transcribed the burials here for 1867-96 this does not cover the period I am interested in. Catherine's father James was already gone by the time she married in 1867 and the family was in London. However, there are buried in the cemetery above four local Noonans who may well be twigs on my tree:
Catherine Noonan, widow, who died 24 Jan 1876 of bronchitis, aged 60, at 2 Ferry Lane, Pope's Quay.
Josephine Noonan, died 5 Jan 1888 aged 1 year of measles, Publican's child from 20 Paul Street, Cork
Mary Noonan, died 5 Mar 1891 aged 65 of "natural decay", lived at North Main Street, Cork but died in Union Hospital (?part of the workhouse), Dealer's widow
George Edward Noonan, who died 30 Aug 1891 of diarrhoea, aged apparently 120 (!) - 120 days? "Contner's child" - may be vintner's child mistranscribed.
Trying to pin down Catherine Hyde's parents was hard, as 4 baptisms seem to suit, in other churches in Cork, leading to parents called
David & Catherine née Connel
John & Catherine née Neil
Jeremiah & Catherine née Clary (twice, presumably the earlier one died).
I did find a baptism for Catherine Hyde in 1802 at St Finbarr's, but the names are unclear and have been transcribed as Berd Hide & Nancy McNamara. I can only guess Berd is short for Bernard, and I can find nothing to match this.
There was a couple James and Catherine Noonan, who seemed a somewhat dramatic pair, always in and out of court; on one occasion in 1855 she accused him of assaulting her (dismissed), in 1850 she had been imprisoned for 1 month, but the offence is frustratingly illegible. It looks like "insub in W/H" but if this means "insubordination in the Workhouse", imprisonment seems somewhat harsh! Anyway, I have no way of proving whether these are "my" James & Catherine, and have my doubts as the court appearances go on after my Catherine came to England, e.g. in 1861 Catherine took one Richard Fitzgerald to court for setting his dogs on a heifer on her land, again dismissed.
Trying to find James' parents was fruitless, and I suspect he was from out of the area, as no baptisms appear for his name around the correct date.

Well, that was quite productive, although I shall probably disprove most of it next time I come to research this family!

Tuesday 13th March 2018


On 7th May 2016, when I studied the three Georges in this tree, I called the eldest one George Ingram 1, my 3x great grandfather, and had his records from marriage onwards. I have been seeking a birth around 1773 but kept coming up with the two options I mentioned before. Another one is 7 Feb 1773 in Manchester Cathedral, transcribed as "Ingham" - I cannot see a scan so don't know how accurate that is. [Later: I have seen Bishop's Transcript and it is clearly Ingham, but that doesn't prove anything]. Nothing else is new.

His son George Ingram 2 was covered, but I now have scans of christening:

and burial:

Also, the burial of his first wife and marriage to his second, which is worryingly in the wrong order:


unless of course the burial was much delayed. I can't find anything in the newspaper, and of course Registration didn't come in until the following year.

The other, George Ingram 3, was his grandson, who went Up North and joined the police force, then got involved in a scam, lost his job and ended up a tobacconist. His story would make a good TV show or movie. No new records or scans are available.

Henry Villiers Ingram - see 11th May 2016 - brother of Edith & Elizabeth. Nothing new.

Henry Wilkins Ingram was troublesome for me in 2016 and now I believe I had his middle name wrong. The scan clearly says "Villiers", but was transcribed as Wilkins.

So, I think the one above was his nephew and named after him. As his father was a waiter, and he was in the 1841 census, I think it very likely that he was the Eating House Keeper who married in Walcot in 1863, especially as one of the witnesses was a Charles Ingram

and he had a brother by that name (although by then living in London). Unfortunately that hasn't helped me, as I still cannot find more for him, or now for her. No announcement was made in the newspapers, as records for those jumps from 1862 to 1865 in this area.

Sunday 11th March 2018

My 3xg grandfather William Henry Hawkins , father of Harriet from yesterday, was born Apr 1808 in Canterbury, Kent to John Hawkins and Elizabeth (I cannot find a marriage record for them, so don't know her maiden name). He was christened on 19 May 1808 at St Mildred's, Canterbury

[1807. The tower has since been removed]

As I said yesterday, when he was 17 he and Harriet Payne had a daughter they called Harriet. Henry was evidently a big, strong lad, as he worked as a Brewer's Labourer, carrying barrels etc about. In 1841 census they can be seen at Wood Cottages, Salt Box Row,  Mortlake, Surrey, Harriet known as Hawkins, claiming to be  his wife. I have searched in vain for a marriage in 1820s, the only one available dated 1867. Historically the area around Mortlake belonged to the Archbishops of Canterbury, so this may have led to them settling there. One of the most famous features of this area was the Mortlake Brewery, which was the largest employer at that time, thus he was in the right place at the right time to become a brewer.  In 1841 he was a labourer, and their address was Wood Cottages, accompanied by a note "near the vineyard". The Vineyard became a noted area, beside the land bought up by the brewery in the 1850s and 1860s. In 1851, as I said yesterday, grandson Henry was with them, then in 1861 William's sister Sarah and grandaughter Alice Gamble aged 2. By this time William had left the brewery (big changes were afoot there, as they were buying up land and building a new brewery 1865) and was listed as a Coal Merchant. In 1871 census he had retired and they can be seen in almshouses just around the corner, built by Bristol philanthropist Edward Coulson, who had a house nearby, which eventually became part of the brewery. William died in Jul 1877 aged 72 and was buried in St Mary's cemetery on 19 Jul. Harriet followed after she died aged 84 in Richmond Union Infirmary (attached to the workhouse) and was buried in the same plot on 16 Mar 1891. See yesterday for photo. As far as I can see Hawkins plot N54 was not close to the Gamble plot Y142, but without visiting I can't be sure.

William's son John Hawkins is not forthcoming with any information, so I shall move on to another tree. My mother's tree has been fully covered, so I shall try to plug a large "hole" in my father's tree.

See my blog on 1st May 2016. Great great grandmother Jemima Ingram's family - she married Gorge Matthews and was my father's paternal great grandmother.
Ann Ingram died aged 8 months and I have a scan of the burial record:


Charles Lewis Ingram, Jemima's brother - see 3rd May 2016 - I now have a scan of his baptism in Walcot:

There was a Charles Lewis Nathaniel Ingram who kept leading me astray, but his father was different, so with a bit of double-checking I could separate possible marriages etc. and military records all belonged to him.

Edith Sabina Ingram - also see 3rd May 2016 - at this stage I already knew 1939 Register, so there is nothing to update.

Elizabeth Mary Ingram - see 4th May 2016 - baptism scan is now available:


Her sister Emily Ingram was similar, although I cannot access the baptism scan for some reason. Her death was reported in the local paper:
27 Feb 1919

In 2016 I didn't report on Emily Jane Ingram because she barely lived for 2 years and I didn't have anything to show you. I now have scans for both birth and death. She was born in Mar 1820 at Arundel Court, Walcot to George and Jemima, 7th child of their 9 and was christened on 16 Apr 1820 at St Swithin's.


She died just before her 2nd birthday and was buried on 24 Jan 1822 at St John the Baptist

1800

Saturday 10th March 2018

At present I am trying to "mop up" updates to those branches I have covered less than others. While on my mother's tree I shall examine the Hawkins branch next. My great great grandmother was Harriet Hawkins and she married great great grandfather James Hugh Gamble. She was born in 1825 in Canterbury, Kent to William Henry Hawkins and Harriet Payne, who were both 17. By the time of the first census in 1841 she was 15 herself and can be seen at Old Market Street, Bristol, working as a servant to a pawnbroker. As often happens, it seems to me, history repeated itself in that she had a child very young, but she did marry first. On 3 Apr 1843 at St Andrew's Holborn she married James Hugh Gamble

In 1851 census she can be seen at 53 Regency Square, Brighton, working as a nurse in the home of a "landed proprietor", while 5 year old son Henry was living with her parents and James was lodging nearby in Mortlake High Street with a greengrocer and family. The following year they all got back together, and lived in Chiswick for a couple of years, 2 further sons born in that area. By the time Alice was born in 1858 they were back in Mortlake and Thomas followed in 1859. 1861 census found them living in Back Lane, Barnes, James was working as a "flyman", i.e. driving a cab, they had 4 children, including Maria only 13 days old and as yet unnamed. Edward was born in 1866 in Mortlake then Isaac (my great grandfather) in Kew. In 1871 they can be seen at Laurel Cottage, Mortlake with four children and they had taken in a boarder. By 1881 they were still there but with only 2 children left at home. James was still working as a cab driver (Isaac followed him into this occupation). I don't know what happened at Christmastime 1883 but James was admitted to the Workhouse in Kew on 2 Jan 1884 and then again 15 Jul 1886 at Richmond. The record mentions his 4 sons by name but I cannot see a scan, so don't know if they were there with him. Unfortunately he was still there when he died in Apr 1890 and was buried on 5 May in St Mary's, Mortlake

Of course, in those days, if you were widowed under these circumstances, it was not good for you if you could not keep yourself. The NHS and Welfare State were years off. So the following year Harriet can be seen in the census at 35 Glasshouse Street, Lambeth (this is Vauxhall) aged 62, and Isaac is with her, working as a Master Cabman, and all is well. However, Isaac married the following year and Harriet was left alone. She can be seen in 1901 at 17 Regency Place, Lambeth, although with several other people. This is just across the main road from Isaac's home, where my grandparents later lived, and I spent much of my childhood - but it is also a stone's throw from the Lambeth Workhouse, which is where we find her next.

Apparently she was admitted on 25 May 1903 aged 76 and the record is distressing: It states as previous address "Streets" and under Name and address of relative or friend "None". She had 6 of her 8 children still alive at that time! I don't know what caused the rift in the family, but when she died at the workhouse in Jul 1913 aged 82 she was buried with James in Mortlake, having been in the Lambeth workhouse for 10 years! She was listed as Nurse (Maternity) so I don't understand why she wasn't in demand.

Tuesday 6th March 2018

Maurice Sidney Taylor, always known as Sidney, was dealt with on 19th June 2015 in some detail, but then vanished. It was not through lack of records, so things haven't improved. His names are confusing, and there are several Maurices and many Sidneys to follow.

In 2015 I said the following with regard to this tree:"I have no idea what the thinking was behind it, but Thomas and Mary Alice decided to name their 4th & 5th children Thomas Charles Henry and Thomas Charles Hinton. They were subsequently known as Tommy and Hinton, but it certainly made it difficult for me!"
Thomas Charles Hinton Taylor - see 22nd June 2015 - in 1939 Register the family can be seen at Dashwood, St Neots Road, Hardwicke, Cambs. I have just spent ages tracing the properties shown in the road, to no avail, as they all had names in 1939 and numbers now. Then I remembered the map attached to the scan by Findmypast. However, this shows they lived in the village of Toft to the south of Hardwick, where there is no St Neots Road. Of course, the area nowadays is dominated by the A428, which was St Neots Road in parts, so there may be nothing left. However, it was useful to know what they were known as; Thomas C H and Rose H Taylor. This enabled me to find their death records. Hinton died only 3 years later and his death was registered 60 miles away in Brentford, Rose 22 years after this in that same area.

[Hinton is back right in this family snap from 1920]

His brother Thomas Charles Henry Taylor, known as Tommy, was covered on 25th June 2015, and the 1939 Register entry on Sunday (below). The former butcher's shop may well have been renovated at this point, because Tom junior was a Postman and the house in Newbury Street now had no butchers in it.

The remaining two on this branch were also duplicates, but this time not brothers, so more excusable! William Henry Taylor aka Harry was covered on 9th July 2015, but I finished it in cousin Vic's words. My 1st-cousin-twice-removed Dewey died aged only 27 in 1908 in Southwark, and her husband Harry in Lambourn on 29 Aug 1920 aged 48. The children moved around the family, as Vic said.

Their son William James Taylor aka Jim was really frustrating, as I had no idea which name to look for. We left him in 1930 working on the Isle of Wight as a waiter, but I cannot find him in 1939 Register as William or James. Likewise no death record.

Monday 5th March 2018

Frederick J W Taylor will be quick, I'm afraid. He was born Jan 1921 in Lambourn to John & Emily, 5th child of 6. I should be able to track him down there in 1939 but I cannot. He was 18 so may be in the services somewhere, excluded through secrecy or stationed abroad. I have found him after the war; on 14 May 1946 he boarded HMS Winchester Castle and sailed from Southampton to Durban, intending to settle in Northern Rhodesia. He was listed as a Carpenter aged 25 with home address of Mill Lane, Lambourn. He died in 1974 in Lusaka, Zambia, aged 53.

His sister Gladys Taylor was born Jan 1914 in Lambourn but that's all I know. By 1939 she was probably married, but I cannot find a record that matches, so I don't know a surname.

Their brother Harry was born (as Henry Thomas Taylor) 5 Aug 1910 in Lambourn and can be seen in 1911 census with parents & sister at Millbrook, Mill Lane, Lambourn, aged 7 months. Vic mentioned in his book that Harry was staying with Uncle Jim & Alice in 1930 in Kew and I can see that on 31 Aug 1935 in Pancras, London he married Dora Florence Dexter, local girl whose father was killed, fighting in Flanders when she was 3. In 1939 Register they can be seen at 55 Orme Road, Kingston, Surrey
2009
Harry was listed as "Carpenter Joiner Foreman" and there is a closed record, presumably their daughter Nora, who was just a year old. I can't find any more details, just the deaths of Dora in 1992 and Harry in 1993 at 47 Sugden Road, Long Ditton, Surrey
2016
3½ miles from Orme Road. Harry left £125,000, possibly the value of the house.

I wrote about the other Henry Taylor on13th June 2015, Annie's grandfather. I'm afraid the scans of 1841 census have not improved as the ink has faded, and everything else was covered before.

Jim (James King Taylor) - see 14th June 2015 - appeared in a few more "snapshots", which help fill in the details of his life. On 4 Dec 1927 he gave away his youngest, daughter Doris, who married Archibald Poley, engineer, giving as her home address 6 The Green, Kew


the butcher's shop, which still looks exactly the same in 2017. The next snapshot in 1939 caught him in the same house/shop along with son Cecil & wife, daughter Doris & her husband. I also have exact dates for his birth 6 May 1873 and death 8 May 1957, and he was cremated in Oxford on 13 May 1957.

For Jack (John Taylor) see 15th June 2015 and I described the 1939 Register on Saturday under Doris. He was listed as Carpenter & Wheelwright.

I told Kate's (Mary Kate Taylor) story in detail on 18th June 2015 and the only thing I can add now is 1939 Register. I did say before that she was crippled with rheumatoid arthritis, and her father Tom was living in Newbury Street next to the Lamb. I have found her next door, in the cottage attached to the pub (here on the right, Tom's house/shop on the left)

Here is the pub with cottage in 2011

I understand that in 2013-16 there was a plan to turn this into a specialist horse vet practice, but can't see that anything has happened. The cottage used to be a mill called Tadpole Mill and a stream runs alongside it. I can see it was useful for Kate, as it was on a level with the road. Meanwhile, Percy can be seen with Vic at 14 Rockfield Avenue, Ealing, along with William Dickie, husband of Winnie who helped look after Kate in the cottage, who was a wholesale drapery salesman and Percy was a "travelling insurance agent" but "totally disabled" - I can't see how that would work without the technology of today!

Sunday 4th March 2018

Florence Lilian Taylor (Dot) was covered in detail on 11th June 2015 but I now have 1939 Register, which answers the question of the 2 possible children from "Staines, Herts" - there is no sign of them, just one child, a closed file as she (Audrey) had not died. The family can be seen at 69 Oakwood Road, Finchley
2014
George is listed as Warehouse Foreman, Dot as Housewife and they had a ?lodger Reginald Stanley, removals transport manager, and one closed file for Audrey.

Frederick Taylor
, known as Shady, was covered on 11th & 12th June 2015. All I can add now is 1939 Register, where he can be seen with a couple John & Emily Giddings. Frederick is listed as General Labourer. I have looked again for military records but can find none - or rather many! It is a common name, unfortunately. Any help would be appreciated if anyone recognises the uniform:


Harriet (Annie) Taylor was covered also on 12th June 2015, in great detail, so it suffices only now to say she can be seen in 1939 Register with her brother Tom in Newbury Street, Lambourn.

I would imagine Edward was still in London, while his company wound up, but if he was at 52 Wedgewood House, China Walk, I cannot find it (I know he was there in 1930). With Tom & Sarah were also their sons William, errand boy, and Edward, yardman. I have a note that both died in 1942, so will look into this. There were also in this household Annie's daughter Gertrude Fitzgerald and her daughter Jill (the other genealogist in this tree, who I have mentioned before), who was just a baby. [OMG I have just realised for her to be shown, she must have died! Jill, if you are reading this and it is a mistake, please get in touch with me!] I shall no doubt return to this record again.

Saturday 3rd March 2018

Robert Mayes Small - see 4th June 2015 - I now have a (bad - sorry) scan of his marriage

This tells me they married on Christmas Day and that Robert was illiterate, as he "made his mark". By 1911, though, he ostensibly completed and signed the schedule, although he was a roadsweeper, and wasn't expected to write.

Sidney Alfred Small - see 5th June 2015, when I had details up to 1898. I have looked into the war records I mentioned and was convinced it was him, as the age is exactly right - 33 years and 11 months. If so, he was mobilised in May 1918 but discharged only 4 months later "unfit for war service" due to "chronic interstitial pneumonia aggravated by military service" (seems odd they didn't pick this up earlier, as he had been deemed Category A on joining up). Anyway, the problem arose with his marriage in 1915. Details led me to a record which stated his father was John Small, labourer, and a witness was a Christina Small, who I don't know of. So, I suspect another blind alley. As I said in 2015, there are many Sidney Smalls, some of which emigrated.

William Small - see 7th June 2015 - was similar in that I traced him into the Services, then he vanished. Even less joy this time, as I discovered the baptism record I had stated his father was called William, his mother Ann. How frustrating!

The next family I have only studied once is the Taylors. Part of my maternal grandfather's tree, they married into the Cox branch and are thus quite obscure relatives - Ancestry tell me that the first one, Alice Louisa Taylor, is related to me by being

niece of spouse of 1st cousin 2x removed
So I shall try to move on quickly
But I do need to stop here for a while, as I have picked her up with husband Philip in 1939 Register and thus disproved one of my conjectures, involving 4 children in Newbury. In 1939 they can be seen with no children at Riverside Cottage, Hungerford

nowadays a fishing cottage available to rent. Philip was listed as "shoeing and general smith, acetylene welder". Daughter Carol is still a possibility, although Poole, where her birth was registered, is 70 miles away, not in Berkshire at all.

Cissie Alice Taylor needs no searching - on 8th June 2015 I had a huge amount of detail. the only new info I have is the 1939 Register, but I already knew where they were from the electoral register - Tufnell Park. The Merlin Rees I mentioned had gone (possibly called up) and by then they were alone at 76 Bickerton Road, just half a mile away. Brinley was a glazier - about to get extremely busy once the bombing started!

I didn't mention Doris I Taylor in 2015 because I knew almost nothing about her. She was born in Lambourn in Jul 1927 to John & Emily née Chapman, sister of Alice above, but 19 years younger, at the opposite end of the 6 siblings. In 1939 Register she can be seen with her parents at Millbrook, Hungerford, father John a carpenter & wheelwright, mother Emily UDD. There is a Mrs Doris Cox with them, but I shall have to seek her out when I do the Coxes again. I think it may be Dolly See, who married Henry Thomas Cox. He was relocated to Liverpool with his company in 1939, so she may have been staying with family meanwhile (John was her uncle). And there is a closed file, which may be her son Peter. In Apr 1950 in Newbury Doris married Leslie Cooper (who may have been the one with his family in 1939 Register at 7 Dunstan Green, Thatcham) but I cannot find a death for either.

Friday 2nd March 2018

Due to adverse weather conditions I am back here sooner than expected.

The next Small I tackled (on 1st June 2015) was the patriarch of this tree, Richard Small. As he was born in 1803 and was (probably) married around 1822, both before the inroduction of registration in England & Wales in 1837, it is difficult to prove his early life. I have now a scan of his second marriage, where he names his father as Joseph, a printer.

What worries me there is that he did not say "deceased", and although not impossible to be 90 at your son's marriage, it would be rare. He said in censuses that he was born around 1802/3 in Bloomsbury, London, so Joseph was probably born around 1780. There are 2 births in the same area at that time, one to a Mary & Edward and one to Samuel & Elizabeth. But as I cannot prove either I shall just put the information to you (and it goes in my notes in pencil!) Another piece of information from the record above is Mary's father, James Ginn. Now I can see the record for her previous marriage in 1844 and her life with first husband William Bedlow. Another of those odd coincidences appears here - her first marriage was at St Mary's, Lambeth, a church we know well! They went on to have three daughters but William died in 1857, when the youngest Charlotte was only a baby. Mary kept the family by working as a "Charwoman" (cleaner), However, by the time she married Richard, the children were grown, and in 1871 census they can be seen at 31 Wellington Street, where Mary died in 1876 aged 55. Now, the other issue here is his children with Louisa. I had assumed that they had just three; James b 1823, Henry b 1826 and Louisa b 1829. However, I have seen baptisms for three further children at the same church, giving parents' names of "Richard Small and Louisa", dated 1817, 1819 and 1820. These may not be them, as they would be remarkably young parents, but in the absence of a marriage record I cannot be sure. I will probably never know... The final years of his life in the Workhouse was outlined in 2015 and I can see the scanned records, culminating in his death on 1 May 1889 at City Road Workhouse, Holborn


Tuesday 27th February 2018

See 22nd May 2015 for Louia Annie Small. She was another of Harry & Daisy's sisters, born 1883 and brought up in institutions with her siblings. I was having trouble with her after the death of her husband Stephen, but thanks to the 1939 Register I have found out what she did after that. In Jul 1935 she married George Thomson and they can be seen in 1939 at Paygate Cottage, Broad Oak, Heathfield. However I can find no more, a death for either of them or any details of George, apart from that he was a Saddler's Harness Maker. Her son William Russell was with them in 1939, a 26-year-old Ag Lab.

For my great great grandmother Louisa Eliza Small, see the very detailed account on 25th May 2015. I now have a scan of her baptism:

and her marriage:


The other Louisa Eliza Small - see 27th May 2015 - her aunt, was baptised with her brother Henry on 28 Dec 1829

and now I can see that the witnesses at her marriage were her niece Alice and brother James

One interesting thing regarding her baptism is that the home address was given as Dorset Mews and Richard was a waterman. This fits with the census in Little Chester Street, as that is the next turning to Dorset Mews. And in 1851 census the two Louisas are with Henry, journeyman farrier. The Royal Stables are around here and he may have trained with them. Nothing more to add to 2015 account.

Mary Ann Small was "my" Louisa's sister - see 31st May & 1st June 2015 - born 1849 to James & Margaret. Her fiancé Richard was witness at Louisa & Reuben's marriage the year before he married her. I suspect the death in West Ham in Jan 1932 is hers. Incidentally, her son Arthur Catling was a sergeant in the metroploitan police force in Hackney.

Monday 26th February 2018

I wasn't sure which order to treat the Henry George Smalls in, as in 2015 I found them most confusing. I think I shall just go with the familiar, so as we know Daisy & Ernest's father best here, I shall go with him first. I called him Henry George Small 2 or Junior, and dealt with him in detail on 16th May 2015 - see that tab.

I found much detail then, and can now confirm that, on leaving the asylum he went to live with Daisy - see Saturday - and her family at Bessborough Place, just off Vauxhall Bridge Road

[these are even-numbers in the photo; there is now a school on the left of photo where odd numbers were, but no reason to think they were any different]
His death was registered in the Chelsea area, just up the road.

Henry George Small Senior was his father, born 1826 - see 15th May 2015 - twin to Louisa Eliza. I now have scans of the baptism record and marriage:



Nothing new, though.

I also had a lot of detail on Henry George Small 3 aka Harry, born 1881, on 17th & 18th May 2015. He died in 1937, so was not on the 1939 Register. Emma can be seen on that at 36 Treswell Road, Dagenham. This fits in with the (unexpected for me then) fact that Harry's death was registered in the Romford area. They were on electoral roll records until 1935 in Westminster, but must have moved to Essex shortly afterwards. Son Albert can be seen in 1939 Register aged 17 working as an assembler in a Motor Works - probably Ford. Emma was UDD (housewife). This confirms what I said in 2015, that the theory of Harry reattesting to serve in WW2 was incorrect. She is shown as a widow and his probate document shows he moved to Essex with her and died there in 1937:

James Frederick Small was Henry Senior's brother (my 3xg grandfather) and I now have a scan of his baptism:

I covered him on 21st May 2015. Nothing new, apart from the fact that when he died, he was buried with his first wife Margaret in Hackney.

There was another James Frederick Small, brother of HGS2, born Oct 1856, and a 15-year-old porter in 1871 census. On 4 Oct 1879 in Bloomsbury he married Julia Jane Rogers, and he was described as a "collar cutter", part of the manufacture of shirts. The same applied in 1881 census at 24 Cooks Road, Newington, when they can be seen with their 5month son Frederick. In 1891 they had moved to Hackney, had 2 children (unfortunately they had 5 but only 2 survived) and James had started working on the Buses, in 1891 as conductor then in 1901 as driver (by which time they were back in Newington), where Julia died in 1902 aged 44, along with her last child, no doubt related deaths. He re-married on 8 Apr 1905, his new wife Sarah Elizabeth Turley, and they can be seen in 1911 census living with his widowed mother-in-law in Croydon, where he was stilll driving buses. When she died in 1914 in Croydon, James and Sarah moved to Eastbourne and took some apartments, where they can be seen in 1939 Register as Housekeepers. Frederick died aged 86 in Uxbridge. I was a little puzzled by this until I saw when Sarah died there in 1964 her probate record said she was resident at "Elmfield Red Cross Home", and no doubt James had been too.

Stop press - I just found out that I covered this James on 4th June 2015. What a shame, it reads almost the same. Oh well, it's done now.

Sunday 25th February 2018

Ernest Stanley Small
was Daisy's brother, born 5 Sep 1890 in Deptford. As with Daisy, he spent a lot of his childhood in and out of workhouses and industrial schools and can also be seen at home in 1901 and 1911 censuses, in the latter listed as a coal porter. On 26 Apr 1914 at St Saviour's Battersea Park, he married Amy Louise Smith

and they can be seen together in 1939 Register. The house they lived in is fascinating, as it was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and built 1929-35, in a stylish chequerboard pattern. It still stands today as in 1970 it was listed.

These flats were little, but classy. Ernest was working then as a Road Sweeper and an agent of the ARP (Air Raid Precautions) Decontamination Service

He died in Jan 1953 aged 62 and Amy 3 years later.

Saturday 24th February 2018

Daisy Ethel Small
was the 4th child of Louisa's cousin Henry, born 4 Jul 1888 at New Cross (registered Greenwich). She spent a very disrupted childhood, in and out of workhouses and Poor Law schools with her siblings, as her parents were not able to look after the children. In one record it states "mother in prison", while Daisy was at South Metropolitan District School in Sutton, Surrey!

Her father was in and out of the workhouse through her early years, but by the time she was 12 things must have taken an upturn - possibly due to her brothers bringing in wages. She was baptised in the Roman Catholic church at that age, and they lived at 11 Chadwick Street. This is all redeveloped now, so I don't know what it was like

Brother Harry went into the army and in 1901 census they could be seen at Chadwick Street, with several other households, but evidently settled. Her mother Louisa died a few weeks later. I see that a Louisa Small had been fined in 1900 for running a brothel just one mile away, so there may be a story there, but that's all that was reported in the newspaper. By the time of the next census, they had moved half a mile, to Vauxhall Bridge Road, where Henry can be seen working as a road sweeper for the council and Ernest was a coal porter. Daisy herself got married shortly after this, to Frederick Ernest Bowers
 
He was a Hawker (Salesman), who had also spent a lot of time in workhouses and industrial schools, so maybe that was how they met. In 1939 Register Daisy can be seen at 31 Bessborough Place, Westminster with 4 "children" - Frederick 24 a builder's labourer, Lilian 20 Shop Assistant, Rose 19 Chemist's Assistant and Henry 16 Delivery Boy. Also one closed file, could be a younger child I don't know of, but all I can see around the redaction is "office". Henry Small - her father - is with them, still evidently an "umbrella finisher". Although Daisy is listed as a widow, I suspect this was an assumption on the part of the enumerator, as Frederick can be seen in Alton, Hampshire, hop-picking, with his brother Joe. I cannot find a death record for him, but Daisy died in Kensington, London in the July quarter of 1973.


I told the story of Elizabeth Small on 12th May 2015. She was Louisa's sister who emigrated to Australia. I have looked, but can find nothing new apart from her funeral notice:


Friday 23rd February 2018

Moving on to my maternal great-great-grandmother Louisa Small's family.

Her sister
Alice Elizabeth Small was just as unforthcoming as when I reviewed her before on 12th May 2015 for a while, but then I suddenly came across a marriage to John Daly in Marylebone

As you can see, one of the witnesses was her sister Louisa. John Daly was a bricklayer but the next time we hear of her he has left her. She was admitted to Westminster Union Workhouse 12 May 1868, with what they described as "Bad Breast" and had a child she named Margaret Mary (after her mother) 5 days later, with the note "husband absent". She readmitted "herself & child" on 26 May and 16 June, but I cannot track either of them down after this. Maybe she died, like her father did in 1871, in the workhouse, and Margaret was given a new name. A John Daly appears in the newspapers of the time, an Irish convict who was released from prison, stopped off in London for a while, and returned to Ireland, but I have no idea if this was her husband. Her brother and mother had died in 1865, then her father, as I said, followed. I cannot, however, find a death for her under this name.The only other snippet of information I have is (from the workhouse records) she was a Charwoman from 29 Broad Street.

[Broad Street 1907 - I got this from a Jack the Ripper site!] This road was the site of the water pump from which John Snow "discovered" cholera in the 1850s. But I can't find any more information at the moment. I don't think she lived there then, she would only have been a child. The 1851 census is missing for James and his two daughters. Margaret was a hospital worker and was visiting in St Geo in the East. This does not bode well, but I will return to it probably tomorrow, dealing with her sister Elizabeth then the two Jameses, father and son.

Tuesday 20th February 2018

In seeking Stephen Hatton on Friday, I built up a picture of a man, born 1758 in Hythe, Kent to Ralph Hatton and Elizabeth, married in 1781 to Mary Marsh at St Margaret-at-Cliffe (12 miles from Hythe, but it stated he was living in Buckland, locally at this time). I cannot prove this is him, but I am confident he is the one in Market Bosworth, Leics, as that was where his children were born. It seems he rented his house in Bosworth from Rev William Wood and the period 1798 to 1799 cost him 2 shillings and 8 pence. He appears in electoral roll of 1830 in Market Bosworth as a Carpenter, and I still think it likely he died on 26 Jan 1833.

His son Thomas Hatton was missed out in 2015 as I had nothing on him. Now I can fill in his details due to access to new records. He was born Feb 1788 in Market Bosworth to Stephen & Mary and christened there on 23 Mar 1788.

He married a lady called Dorothy, but I cannot locate the marriage record. There is one in Melbourne, Derbyshire 11 Jul 1818 but given that Dorothy was 48 years old and there is a note "with consent of parents" I doubt this is correct. that would give her maiden-name as Hays, but I will reserve judgment. They can be seen in censuses of 1841, 1851 & 1861 in Swepstone Village, Leics, Thomas listed as Bricklayer. In 1851 they had a lodger John Underwood, pauper framework knitter. Dorothy was 17 years older than Thomas and when she died on 20 Oct 1864 she was 94 years of age. He didn't last much longer and followed her 7 weeks later. He died 9 Dec 1864 aged 77.


Thomas Herbert Hatton was the young man who joined the army and was Killed in Action in 1917. I have now found his baptism record:

After his death his effects and backpay were sent to his father Herbert in 1919.

William Hatton (my 4xg grandfather) was dealt with on 11th May 2015, but now I can see scans of the documents: his baptism

his marriage

  the banns in Broughton prior to his marriage, and the ceremony on Old Dalby:

As I noted under Selina, he was minister in Broughton, and this was confirmed by his will:

In this, he left the sum of £200 to each of his daughters and all his land and buildings to son William, sole executor.

This William Hatton, my 4xg uncle, struggled, it seems, to manage his inheritance, as he ended up in court twice for failure to pay bills. In 1859 as "overseer of the poor" at Nether Broughton he omitted to pay his village's contibution to the upkeep of the workhouse, and in 1864 a "church rate", which I understand he refused to pay. Both times he was found guilty and fined. As I said in 2015, he left effects worth £422 to son Herbert and son-in-law Leonard (about £38,000 today).

Monday 19th February 2018

Herbert William Hatton was brother of Emma, Francis & Elizabeth I mentioned yesterday. I was led astray by several red herrings again, including a baptism and several electoral roll records, for another Herbert William Hatton born in the same year, or a Herbert J Hatton in the same area. So I shall stick with what I've got.

Laura Annie Hatton was his 4th child, and was dealt with on 8th May 2015 following her father. I have now located a baptism record from Old Dalby dated 19 Jan 1896

In 1939 Register she can be seen at The Lodge, The Pastures, Bingham, Notts with husband Ebenezer. There are two closed files, so I thought maybe they did have some children, and in looking have answered the query as to who the Thomas was that they left their effects to. Daughter Ruth A Cross was born in the July quarter of 1933 and son Thomas Herbert Cross was born Apr 1936. I see that they named their son after Laura's brother, who died in WW1. Although the only marriage I can find for Ruth was in 1968, she had probably left home by the time her mother died, leaving effects to her son only. Incidentally, I just noticed Laura had both her children in her fifties! I cannot track down the address in current Bingham, unfortunately, but featured the house where Laura died in 2015.

My great great great grandmother Louisa Hatton was also covered on 8th May 2015 and here is the marriage records of her and her sister:

I cannot track down a baptism for her in Leicestershire or death in London, other than the info I mentioned.

Mabel Elizabeth Hatton was youngest child of Herbert & Ann, but despite looking for baptism and 1939 Register, I found nothing new. 1939 Register was particularly frustrating as I had discovered her exact date of birth, which is usually a big help in this. As George had been in WW1, I wasn't surprised not to find him, as he may well have found a position in the forces again, as he was only 42.

Selina Hatton can be seen on the marriage lines above, witnessing the marriage of both her sisters in 1847. She herself followed a few weeks later, marrying William Lockton:

The puzzle as to why all these marriages occurred at the local church in Old Dalby but she was baptised in Broughton Sulney was answered by a close look at the baptism entry (now scanned and uploaded):

It can there be seen that William, her father, was the minister who baptised her and that was presumably his church. (Although it says "registered", this doesn't mean what we usually take it to mean, as National Registration did not come into force in Britain until 1837, 22 years later). Her second marriage registration can be seen to not have a year on it,

and the entry above it bears the year 1861, so it has been assumed to be the same. However, it appears in the list for Melton Mowbray area in Jun-Sep 1862. the other new record I found today was Thomas' probate: when he died on 19 Mar 1894 in Car Colston he left effects worth £85 14s 6d (equivalent to about £7800 today) to son Thomas, a land surveyor living in Epperstone, 6½ miles away.

Sunday 18th February 2018

Francis Hatton was son of William and Jane I mentioned yesterday, and thus brother of Emma & Elizabeth (also Herbert, see later). I started off with a red herring regarding him, as I found a bunch of Trade Directory documents in the right area but they showed him as a gardener in 1863, a farmer in 1876 & 1881. I was enthusiastic at first, as a Henry and two Williams were mentioned, but soon it dawned that in 1863 he was only 12. There was also another, a shopkeeper, but even less likely as it was dated 1849, the year before he was born!

As I stated on 7th May 2015, Francis Hatton died before his daughter was born, so they named her Frances, and I outlined her life also on that day. She was not the lady I saw many times on the electoral roll in Leicester, as I know she lived in Bedford after her marriage. However, by 1939 they can be seen at 20 Priory Road, West Bridgford, Notts (just off the Grantham Canal). Arthur was manager of a Hosiery Manufacturer company (of which there were many in Notts), Frances a housewife and Frank was still at home aged 30, a solicitor and part-time stretcher-bearer
2016
By the time they died in 1952 they had moved across West Bridgford to 51 Kingswood Road
2016

Francis William Hatton was the son of Herbert & Ann née Biddles, who died aged 29 three years after his marriage. He was evidently much loved and missed, as in the Grantham Journal newspaper of Feb 1921 there appeared the following:
In ever-loving memory of my dear husband Francis William Hatton, who died February 16th, 1919
Oh! How I miss him, tongue cannot tell -
The happy face I loved so well.
The fondest of memories is all that is left
Of a dear loving husband - one of the best.

From his sorrowing wife
In ever-loving memory of our dear son Francis William Hatton, who died February 16th 1919
Days of sadness still come o'er us,
Tears of sorrow often flow:
Memory keep our dear son near us, Though he died two years ago

From his loving Father, Mother & Sisters
In ever-loving memory of our dear Francis, who died February 16th 1919
God took him home, it was His will
But in our hearts he lingers still

From Mr & Mrs T Shelton & Family
(his in-laws)
Friday was the 99th anniversary of his death

Saturday 17th February 2018

I am returning to genealogy as there are new records available on most sites and, as I am still paying substantial subscriptions to these, I really ought to see them.

Unsure where to start this time, I charted all the coverage in this blog and came to the conclusion that all branches of the four trees have been covered twice, and some three times, except for the four slightly more obscure families Hatton, Small, Ingram and Samways, only covered once. Thus, for no other reason but this, I feel I should start there.


I decided to start with Anne Hatton, as she was first in my folder. I knew her father was Stephen, her mother was Mary and she was baptised in Market Bosworth, Leics on 17 Apr 1785. She was the middle child with 2 brothers William born 1783 and Thomas 1788. However, I could find nothing further on her, despite searching in Ancestry, Findmypast and FamilySearch. As the name Stephen is fairly uncommon (unlike Mary, Anne, William and Thomas) I spent some time looking for him. I did find an obituary for a Mary Ann Hatton 1796-1819 giving a father's name as Stephen, but frustratingly no place was given. One thing that intrigued me was that another genealogist has put on their Ancestry tree a daughter Mary Ann with those dates - but she may have seen the same information and jumped to the same conclusion. I have also seen an obituary record in the name of Stephen, who died 26 Jan 1833 in Leicester, but cannot confirm this on Ancestry. I saw only 4 references to marriage to a Mary, all relating to nuptials in 1781 in Kent, and stating the groom was from Buckland, bride from St-Margaret-at-Cliffe. The date makes sense as their first child William came along 2 years later, but the place is a leap of faith... I cannot find marriage or death for Anne in the Leics area.

I told about my 4xgreat aunt Caroline Hatton on 1st May 2015, when I covered this family before. I can still find no baptism for her but here is the marriage to Isaac Burroughs:

There are two curious things here. One is that his father is said to be a farmer rather than schoolmaster and the other is the witnesses: William & Louisa Hatton (her siblings) and John & Jane Woodford. John Woodford was to marry her sister Louisa the following year, Jane Woodford was his sister. The two families were evidently very close. Isaac's father James was stated to be schoolmaster at his son's baptism but by the time he married was a farmer.

James died in 1837 so never appeared on a census for me to check.

Elizabeth Hatton, as I said on 2nd May 2015, was the daughter of their son William & Jane Woodford. I had all the details in 2015, so will report no new ones here.

Emma Elizabeth Hatton's 2015 account was even more detailed. She was Elizabeth's sister, and being the eldest was actually baptised:

but all the records were there already.

Emma Jane Hatton, her niece, was baptised on 17 Jun 1888 at Old Dalby:

I have also picked up more information at the other end of her life. I wasn't sure where in Leicestershire she died, but now have this on her probate document. She died aged 86 at 19 Shirley Drive, Syston, Leics on 9 Feb 1975, leaving £14,857 but the records don't say to whom by then.
2009